How To Fix a Leggy Lavender (An Easy Guide)

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Lavender plants are known for their lovely scent and beautiful purple blooms.

But lavender plants sometimes become leggy, with long stems and few leaves. They may also produce fewer flowers than usual, and the flowers may be small.

There are a few reasons why your lavender plant may become leggy.

But don’t worry, it’s easy to fix!

In this article, you will find everything you need to know about leggy lavender plants, including their causes and how to fix them.

What Causes Lavender Plants to Become Leggy?

There are a few reasons why your lavender plant may become leggy.

One reason is that the plant is not getting enough sunlight.

Lavender plants need at least six hours of sunlight per day to thrive. If they are not getting enough sunlight, they will stretch out in an attempt to reach the light.

Another reason lavender plants may become leggy is that they are grown in rich, fertile soil.

Lavender plants prefer sandy, well-drained soil.

If the soil is too fertile, the plant will develop a straggly, unkempt appearance with lots of foliage and few blooms.

Too much nitrogen in the soil can also cause lavender plants to become leggy. Nitrogen is a nutrient that encourages green growth.

So, if your lavender plant gets too much nitrogen, it will produce many leaves and stems but few flowers.

Finally, lavender plants may become leggy if they are not pruned correctly.

Lavender plants must be pruned annually to promote healthy growth and prevent legginess.

If you neglect to prune lavender plants, they will become leggy and produce fewer flowers.

How To Tell If Your Lavender Plant Is Leggy

A few signs will tell you if your lavender plant is leggy.

Here are some things to look for:

The Plant Has Long, and Woody Stems With Few Leaves

It is probably leggy if your lavender plant has long, woody stems with few leaves.

Leggy lavender plants have mostly bare stems with just a few leaves at the tips.

The Flowers Are Small and Few

Another sign of a leggy lavender plant is small, sparse flowers.

Leggy plants produce fewer flowers than healthy plants.

The flowers may also be smaller than usual, and the plant may bloom less often.

The Plant Is Stretching Towards the Light

It is probably leggy if your lavender plant is stretching towards the light.

Lavender plants need at least six hours of sunlight per day.

If they are not getting enough sunlight, they will stretch out in an attempt to reach the light.

The Plant Is Not Growing New Leaves

It is probably leggy if your lavender plant is not growing new leaves.

Leggy plants have long stems with few leaves.

They may also produce fewer flowers than usual, and the flowers may be small.

The Plant Looks Unkempt and Straggly

If your lavender plant looks unkempt and straggly, it is probably leggy.

Leggy plants have a wild, untamed appearance. They may also produce fewer flowers than usual.

How To Fix a Leggy Lavender Plant

There are a few things you can do to fix a leggy lavender plant.

Here are some tips:

Give the Plant More Sunlight

One way to fix a leggy lavender plant is to give it more sunlight.

Lavender plants need at least six hours of sunlight per day to thrive. If your plant is not getting enough sunlight, move it to a sunnier location.

Lavender plants thrive in full sun. So, choose a spot in your garden that gets six to eight hours of sunlight per day.

You can also try growing lavender in a pot so you can move it around to find the perfect spot.

When grown indoors, lavender plants need a south-facing window to get enough sunlight.

Prune the Plant

Another way to fix a leggy lavender plant is to prune it.

Lavender plants must be pruned annually to promote healthy growth and prevent legginess.

If you neglect to prune your lavender plant, it will become leggy and produce fewer flowers.

Pruning lavender plants will encourage them to produce new growth and more flowers.

Prune your lavender plant in early spring before new growth begins.

After pruning, your lavender plant may look a little bare. But don’t worry, it will quickly start to produce new growth.

Repot the Plant

If your lavender plant is leggy due to overfertilization or too fertile soil, you can try repotting it.

Repotting your lavender plant will help to reduce the amount of nitrogen in the soil.

To repot your lavender plant, choose a pot that is about twice the size of the current pot.

Fill the new pot with fresh, well-draining potting mix. A sandy loam or cactus mix is ideal.

Carefully remove your lavender plant from the current pot and shake off any excess soil.

Place the plant in the new pot and fill in around it with potting mix.

Don’t water your lavender plant for a few days after repotting to allow the roots to adjust to the new pot.

How to Prune Leggy Lavender Plants (A Step-By-Step Guide)

If you want to prune your leggy lavender plant, follow these steps:

  1. Start by removing any dead or diseased stems. Cut these back to healthy growth using sharp, clean shears.
  2. Cut back any long, leggy stems to about 6 inches. Make sure to cut just above a leaf node so the plant can produce new growth.
  3. Cut back any stems that are growing in the wrong direction. Lavender plants should have a mounded shape. So, cut back any stems sticking out or growing too tall.
  4. Once you’ve pruned all the stems, shape the plant by trimming any straggly branches.
  5. Finally, give the plant a good haircut by trimming all the stems to the same length.

After pruning, your lavender plant will look much better. It will also produce more flowers.

How To Prevent Leggy Lavender Plants

There are a few things you can do to prevent leggy lavender plants.

Here are some tips:

Give the Plants Enough Sunlight

Lavender plants need at least six hours of sunlight each day. If they don’t get enough sunlight, they will become leggy.

Make sure to plant your lavender in a spot with plenty of sun.

Lavender plants thrive in full sun, so the more sun they get, the better.

Indoor lavender plants need to be placed near a sunny window. South-facing windows are best.

You can give your lavender plants artificial light if you live in a climate with long winters and short summers. Place them under grow lights for 12 to 16 hours each day.

Turn the Plants Regularly

Lavender plants grow best when they’re turned regularly. Every few days, hang the pots so the plants face a different direction.

This will ensure that all sides of the plant get an equal amount of sunlight.

If you have lavender plants in the ground, you can lightly rake them every few days to encourage new growth.

Prune Your Lavender Plants Regularly

Lavender plants need to be pruned every year to prevent legginess.

Prune your plants in early spring before new growth begins.

Cut off any dead or woody base stems.

Trim the plant back by one-third to one-half.

Be sure to use sharp pruning shears to avoid damaging the plant.

After you’ve pruned your lavender plants, they will look sad. But don’t worry; they will quickly bounce back and start to grow new stems.

Use the Right Soil

Lavender plants need sandy, well-drained soil. The plants will become leggy if the soil is too fertile or too dense.

To improve the drainage of your soil, add perlite, vermiculite, or sand.

You can also plant your lavender in raised beds or pots. This will help ensure the roots don’t sit in water too long.

Water the Plant Correctly

Lavender plants need to be watered deeply, but not too often. Over-watering can

Make sure the pot you use has drainage holes in the bottom.

Don’t Use Too Much Fertilizer

If your lavender plant is leggy, it may be because you use too much fertilizer.

Too much nitrogen in the soil can cause lavender plants to become leggy. Nitrogen is a nutrient that encourages green growth.

So, if your lavender plant gets too much nitrogen, it will produce many leaves and stems but few flowers.

To avoid this, only fertilize your lavender plant once a year in the spring.

And, when you do fertilize, use a balanced fertilizer that is low in nitrogen.

You can also try using organic methods to fertilize your lavender plant.

Compost or manure tea are both excellent options. These will provide your plant with the nutrients it needs without causing it to become leggy.

Final Thoughts

Lavender is an excellent plant in your garden – not only does it look beautiful, and it has many benefits for your health and well-being.

However, if your lavender looks leggy and unkempt, it can be a real eyesore.

Luckily, there are a few easy things you can do to fix a leggy lavender.

First, make sure you’re pruning it regularly.

Second, ensure that it’s getting enough sunlight.

And finally, make sure the soil is well-drained.

If you follow these simple tips, your lavender will soon look as good as new!