Indoor Plant Leaves Drooping? (7 Causes and Solutions)

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Houseplants are an excellent way to bring a bit of nature into your home.

They can improve indoor air quality, boost mood, and even help you focus and be more productive.

But sometimes, your houseplants can develop problems.

One common issue is drooping leaves.

Why Are My Indoor Plant Leaves Drooping and How Can You Fix It?

If you’ve ever found your indoor plant leaves drooping, you know it can be a frustrating experience.

After all, you take good care of your plants and give them the best possible care, so why are their leaves still drooping?

There are a few different reasons why your indoor plant leaves might be drooping; fortunately, there are solutions for each.

1. Underwatering

One of the most common reasons for indoor plant leaves drooping is underwatering.

Underwatering is a common problem for indoor plants.

When the soil is too dry, it can cause the leaves to droop and the plant to wilt.

This is often the first sign that a plant is not getting enough water.

In addition to droopy leaves, underwatering can cause the stems to become weak and slender and the flowers to fade.

If a plant is severely underwatered, it may stop growing altogether.

How To Tell If Your Houseplant Is Underwatered

If your houseplant’s leaves are drooping, it may be underwatered. Here are seven signs to look for:

  • The leaves are wilting or drooping.
  • The plant is not growing as quickly as it should.
  • The leaves are yellowing or turning brown.
  • The leaves are dry or crispy.
  • The soil is dry.
  • The plant is wilting after being watered.
  • The soil is hard and compacted.

If you see any of these signs, your plant is probably underwatered.

How To Fix an Underwatered Houseplant

If you think your plant is underwatered, you can do a few things to help it recover.

First, water the plant thoroughly. Ensure the soil is moist all the way through, and that water comes from the drainage holes in the pot.

You may need to water your plant more frequently than usual until it recovers.

You can try misting the leaves with water to help them perk up if the leaves are wilted.

In general, indoor plants need to be watered about once a week.

Be sure to check the soil before watering to make sure it is dry.

Overwatering can also be a problem for indoor plants, so it is important not to water too often.

2. Overwatering

While underwatering is a common problem, overwatering can also be an issue.

While giving your plants enough water, it is also crucial not to drown them.

When you overwater a plant, the roots cannot get the oxygen they need, leading to root rot.

In addition, too much water can cause the leaves to droop as they try to absorb the excess moisture.

Overwatering is usually a problem with plants that are in pots without drainage holes.

When the soil is constantly wet, it can cause the roots to rot.

How To Tell If Your Indoor Plant Is Overwatered

There are a few telltale signs that your indoor plant is overwatered:

  • The leaves are wilting or drooping, even when the soil is dry
  • The leaves are turning yellow or brown
  • The leaves have started to fall off
  • The stem is soft or mushy
  • Mold is growing on the soil or the plant
  • The roots are black or brown
  • The soil is soggy or wet

If you see any of these signs, your plant is probably overwatered.

How To Fix an Overwatered Indoor Plant

If you think your plant is overwatered, you can do a few things to help it recover.

First, stop watering the plant and let the soil dry out completely.

Watering less often will help the plant recover.

In addition, you can try repotting the plant in a pot with drainage holes to allow the excess water to drain out.

If the roots are rotted, you may need to trim them back to healthy tissue.

Once the plant has recovered, water it only when the soil is dry.

3. Low Humidity

Another common reason for indoor plant leaves drooping is low humidity.

Many indoor plants come from tropical climates where the air is very humid.

When these plants are grown in a dry climate, the leaves may start to droop as they try to conserve moisture.

Most homes have very low humidity, which can be a problem for many plants.

How To Tell If Your Plant Needs More Humidity

There are some telltale signs that your droopy plant is not getting enough humidity.

The leaves may turn brown and crispy, especially at the tips.

Check the houseplant leaves for brown spots.

These spots are usually caused by the leaves drying out.

If the leaves are wilting, that is another sign that the plant is not getting enough humidity.

How To Raise The Humidity For Your Plant

There are a few different ways to raise the humidity of your indoor plants.

One way is to mist the leaves with water several times a day.

This will help to raise the humidity around the plant.

Another way is to put the plant on a pebble tray.

This is a tray with water and pebbles to raise the plant out of the water.

The water will evaporate and help to raise the humidity around the plant.

You can also use a humidifier to raise the humidity in the room.

This is a good option if you have several plants that need more humidity.

Keep an eye on the humidity level so it does not get too high, which can also harm plants.

4. Not Enough Sunlight

Too little sunlight is another common reason for indoor plant leaves drooping.

Plants need sunlight to photosynthesize and create food for themselves.

Without enough sunlight, the plants will start to starve, and the leaves will begin to droop.

How To Tell If Your Plant Is Not Getting Enough Sunlight

There are a few telltale signs that your plant is not getting enough sunlight.

The leaves may start to turn yellow or pale.

The plant may also start to stretch out, reaching for the sun.

The leaves may also begin to drop off.

If you see any of these signs, it’s time to move your plant to a sunnier spot.

How To Give Your Plant More Sunlight

If your plant is not getting enough sunlight, you can do a few things to give it more.

The first thing to do is move the plant to a sunnier spot.

A west- or south-facing window is usually best for most plants. This will give the plant enough sunlight throughout the day and prevent it from getting too much sunlight, which can also be harmful.

If you cannot move the plant, you can also try using grow lights.

Grow lights are artificial lights that simulate sunlight and can be used to give plants the light they need to grow.

5. Temperature Stress

Temperature stress is another common reason for indoor plant leaves drooping.

Plants are susceptible to changes in temperature and can be harmed by cold and hot weather.

If the temperature is too cold, the plant may go into shock, and the leaves will droop.

If the temperature is too hot, the plant will start to wilt, and the leaves will droop.

Houseplants need to be kept in an environment between 60 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

A stable temperature is also important.

Sudden temperature changes can harm plants and may cause the leaves to droop.

How To Tell If Your Plant Is Stressed By Temperature

When indoor plants are exposed to high or low temperatures, their leaves will start to droop.

Other signs of temperature stress include:

  • Leaves turning yellow or brown
  • Leaves falling off the plant
  • Houseplant leaves curling
  • The plant is wilting
  • The plant is growing more slowly than usual
  • Stunted growth

Also, the leaves will feel stiff and brittle when a plant has cold damage.

The leaves will feel limp and wilted if the temperature is too hot.

How To Fix Temperature Stress In Your Plant

Many indoor plants are happy to live in a range of temperatures, but some prefer a slightly warmer or cooler environment.

If your plant shows signs of stress, such as wilting leaves or stunted growth, it may be due to temperature stress.

Here are some tips on how to fix temperature stress in your plant:

  • Move your plant to an ideal location for its preferred temperature range. This may mean moving it closer to or further away from a window, for example.
  • Make sure the room your plant is in is well-ventilated. A stuffy room can cause the air around your plant to become too warm or too cold, stressing it out.
  • If the temperature in your home is generally too hot or too cold for your plant, try using a humidifier or dehumidifier to create a more stable environment.
  • Avoid sudden temperature changes. Sudden changes, such as placing your plant near a drafty window or opening the door to a cold room, can harm your plant.

6. Pests

Pests are another common reason for indoor plant leaves drooping.

Many types of pests can infest houseplants, including aphids, spider mites, and mealybugs.

These pests suck the nutrients from the plants, which weaken the plants and cause the leaves to droop.

Pests can also spread diseases, which can further damage the plant.

How To Tell If Your Plant Has Pests

There are a few signs that will help you tell if your plant has pests:

  • Sticky leaves: Many pests, such as aphids and mealybugs, secrete a sticky substance called honeydew. This substance can attract other pests and cause mold to grow on the plant.
  • Holes in leaves: Some pests, such as caterpillars, mites, and beetles, will eat holes in the leaves of plants.
  • Discolored leaves: Many pests will cause the leaves of a plant to turn yellow or brown.

If you see any of these signs, your plant may have pests.

How To Get Rid Of Pests On Your Plant

If you think your plant has pests, there are a few things you can do to get rid of them:

  • Isolate the plant: If you have more than one plant, it’s crucial to isolate the one with pests. This will prevent the pests from spreading to the other plants.
  • Remove the pests by hand: If you can see them on your plant, you may be able to remove them by hand. Use a cotton swab or a soft brush to remove the pests from the plant gently.
  • Use neem oil: Neem oil is a natural pesticide used to kill pests. It’s safe for humans and animals, but it will kill most common houseplant pests.
  • Use insecticidal soap: Insecticidal soap is a safe and effective way to get rid of most types of pests. You can make your own insecticidal soap by mixing 1 cup of water with 1 teaspoon of dish soap.

7. Transplant Shock

Transplant shock is another common reason for indoor plant leaves drooping.

Transplant shock occurs when a plant is moved from one location to another and can happen to outdoor and indoor plants.

When a plant is transplanted, the roots are disturbed, which can cause stress to the plant.

This stress can manifest in the form of drooping leaves.

How To Tell If Your Plant Is Experiencing Transplant Shock

There are a few signs that will help you tell if your plant is experiencing transplant shock:

  • Wilting leaves: One of the most common signs of transplant shock is wilting leaves. This happens because the roots can’t take up enough water to hydrate the plant.
  • Leaves turning yellow or brown: Another common sign of transplant shock is leaves that turn yellow or brown. This happens when the roots are damaged and can’t take up nutrients from the soil.
  • Stunted growth: If your plant is not growing as quickly as it should be, it may be experiencing transplant shock.

If you see any of these signs, your plant may be experiencing transplant shock.

How To Help Your Plant Recover From Transplant Shock

There are a few things you can do to help your plant recover from transplant shock:

  • Give the plant time to adjust: It takes time for a plant to adapt to a new location. Give your plant at least a week to acclimate to its new home before you start making any changes.
  • Water the plant regularly: Watering your plant regularly will help reduce transplant shock stress. Ensure you’re watering your plant deeply, so the roots can get the moisture they need.
  • Prune the plant: Pruning your plant will help it focus its energy on new growth. Remove any dead or dying leaves, stems, or branches.

With time and care, your plant will recover from transplant shock and start to thrive in its new home.

How To Prevent Houseplant Leaves From Drooping

To keep your houseplants healthy and prevent leaves from drooping, there are a few things you can do:

1. Check the Soil

First and foremost, check the soil your indoor plant is growing in. Is it too wet or too dry?

If the soil is too wet, your plant’s roots are probably suffocating, which will cause the leaves to droop.

On the other hand, if the soil is too dry, the plant isn’t getting enough water, which will also cause the leaves to droop.

The ideal soil moisture for most houseplants is somewhere in the middle – not too wet and not too dry.

2. Adjust Watering Schedule

Once you’ve checked the soil moisture level, adjust your watering schedule accordingly.

If the soil is too wet, water your plant less often.

If the soil is too dry, water your plant more often. It’s also a good idea to let the top layer of soil dry out between watering sessions.

3. Improve Air Circulation

Poor air circulation can also cause leaves to droop.

If your indoor plant leaves are drooping, try moving it to a spot where it will get more airflow.

4. Check for Pests

Check for pests if your indoor plant leaves are drooping, and you can’t figure out why.

Aphids, mealybugs, spider mites, and other pests can cause leaves to droop.

If you see any pests on your plant, remove them ASAP.

5. Prune Dead or Damaged Leaves

If you see any dead or damaged leaves on your plant, prune them off.

This will help encourage new growth and prevent the spread of disease.

6. Provide Adequate Light

If your indoor plant is not getting enough light, the leaves will start to droop.

Most houseplants need at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day. If your plant is not getting enough light, try moving it to a brighter spot.

7. Keep Room Temperature Consistent

Extreme temperature changes can cause leaves to droop.

If the temperature in your home fluctuates too much, it can stress your plant and cause the leaves to droop.

To prevent this, try to keep the room temperature as consistent as possible.

Final Thoughts

If you have an indoor plant whose leaves are drooping, don’t despair.

In most cases, the problem is relatively easy to fix.

Paying attention to your plant’s watering needs, light requirements, and temperature preferences can help it recover in no time.

With some care and attention, your indoor plant will return to its healthy self in no time.