How To Save a Dying Monstera Plant (11 Causes & Solutions)

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Monstera plants are one of the most popular houseplants, and for a good reason!

They’re easy to care for, thrive in many different environments, and look beautiful.

However, sometimes monstera plants can start to die, even when they’re being well cared for.

If you’re noticing your monstera plant is dying, don’t despair!

There are a few things you can do to try and save it.

In this article, we’ll go over 11 possible causes of a dying monstera plant, as well as solutions you can try to bring your houseplant back to health.

Why Is My Monstera Dying?

There are a few different reasons why your monstera plant might be dying.

Some of the most common causes include:

1. Overwatering

One of the most common reasons monstera plants die is because they’re overwatered.

Monsteras need to be in well-draining soil and prefer to be on the drier side, so it’s important not to water them too often.

Overwatering usually occurs when the plant is in a pot that doesn’t have proper drainage or when the soil isn’t allowed to dry out completely between waterings.

An overwatered monstera usually has yellow or brown leaves, droopy leaves, and mushy stems.

How To Tell If You’re Overwatering Your Monstera Plant

You can look out for a few signs that indicate you may be overwatering your monstera plant.

These include:

  • Yellow or brown leaves
  • Drooping leaves
  • Black or brown spots on the leaves
  • Mushy or rotten stems
  • Soil that’s constantly wet or soggy
  • Rotting roots

How To Save An Overwatered Monstera Plant

If you think you may be overwatering your monstera plant, the first thing you should do is stop watering it for a while.

Let the soil dry out completely before watering again, and make sure the pot has good drainage.

You may also need to repot the plant into a pot with better drainage.

If the roots are rotting, you may need to trim them back and repot the plant in fresh soil.

Make sure you use a well-draining soil mix and allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings.

2. Underwatering

Underwatering is another common reason monstera plants die.

Though they are tough plants that can tolerate some neglect, they still need to be watered regularly.

Underwatering happens when the plant doesn’t get enough water, and the soil becomes too dry.

If you don’t provide enough water, the leaves will start to brown and drop off, and the plant will eventually die.

How To Tell If You’re Underwatering Your Monstera Plant

You can look for a few signs indicating you may be underwatering your monstera plant.

These include:

  • Dry, crispy leaves
  • Drooping leaves
  • Wilting leaves
  • Curling leaves
  • Stunted growth

How To Save An Underwatered Monstera Plant

If you think you may be underwatering your monstera plant, the first step is to check the soil.

Look at the top layer of the potting mix and see if it’s dry to the touch.

If it feels moist, you don’t need to water your plant just yet.

However, if the topsoil is completely dry, then it’s time to give your monstera plant a good drink.

Water your plant thoroughly and moisten the entire root ball evenly.

Allow the excess water to drain away, and don’t leave your plant sitting in water.

3. Too Much Sunlight

Though monstera plants tolerate a wide range of light conditions, they can still suffer if they get too much sunlight.

If your indoor plant is in direct sunlight for too long, the leaves will start to turn yellow or brown and eventually dry out and fall off.

A monstera plant needs bright indirect light to thrive, so it’s essential to find a spot that gets bright light but isn’t in direct sunlight.

How To Tell If Your Monstera Is Getting Too Much Sunlight

You can look out for a few signs that indicate your monstera plant is getting too much sunlight.

These include:

  • Yellow or brown patches on the leaves
  • Dry, crispy leaves
  • Leaves that are falling off
  • Leaves that are sunburned or faded in color

How To Save A Monstera Plant That’s Getting Too Much Sunlight

If you think your monstera plant is getting too much sunlight, the first thing you should do is move it to a spot that gets less light.

You may also need to protect it from the sun, such as shading the plant with a light-colored curtain or placing it in a room that doesn’t get direct sunlight.

An east- or west-facing window is a good spot for a monstera plant.

To thrive, Monstera plants need at least four hours of indirect sunlight daily.

4. Not Enough Sunlight

Though monstera plants can tolerate low light conditions, they still need some sunlight to grow.

If your plant isn’t getting enough light, it will stretch out, and the leaves will become pale.

Eventually, the plant will stop growing, and the leaves will start to fall off.

The leaves will also be smaller than usual, and the plant may stop producing new leaves altogether.

Monstera plants need bright indirect light to thrive, so finding a spot that gets good light but isn’t in direct sunlight is essential.

How To Tell If Your Monstera Is Not Getting Enough Sunlight

You can look out for a few signs that indicate your monstera plant is not getting enough sunlight.

These include:

  • Leggy growth
  • Pale leaves
  • Slow growth
  • Plant leaning towards the light
  • Small leaves

How To Save A Monstera Plant That’s Not Getting Enough Sunlight

If you think your monstera plant is not getting enough sunlight, the first thing you should do is move it to a spot that gets more light.

The best place for a monstera plant is in an east- or west-facing window. This will give the plant enough light to grow without being in direct sunlight, which can be harmful.

You may also need to provide supplemental lighting, such as grow lights, to ensure your plant gets enough light.

5. Nutrient Deficiency

Monstera plants need a balance of nutrients to grow.

If your plant isn’t getting enough of certain nutrients, it will start to show signs of deficiency.

The most common nutrient deficiencies in monstera plants are nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium.

Nitrogen deficiency will cause the leaves to turn yellow, while phosphorus deficiency will cause the leaves to turn purple or red.

Potassium deficiency will cause the leaves to turn brown and dry out.

A nutrient deficiency can cause the plant to stop growing and produce new leaves.

How To Tell If Your Monstera Has A Nutrient Deficiency

You can look out for a few signs that indicate your monstera plant has a nutrient deficiency.

These include:

  • Yellowing leaves
  • Purpling or red leaves
  • Brown, dry leaves
  • Leaves falling off the plant
  • Stunted growth
  • Lack of new leaves

How To Save A Monstera Plant With A Nutrient Deficiency

If you think your monstera plant has a nutrient deficiency, you should first get a soil test to see which nutrients are lacking.

You can then add a fertilizer that contains these nutrients to the soil.

It’s essential only to add the recommended amount of fertilizer, as too much can be as harmful as too little.

You can also add compost to the soil, which will help improve the overall nutrient content.

6. Overfertilization

Though monstera plants need nutrients to grow, it’s essential not to overfertilize them.

If you give your plant too much fertilizer, the excess nutrients will build up in the soil and burn the roots.

This can cause the monstera leaves to turn black, brown, or yellow.

The monstera leaves may also start to curl up and fall off the plant.

Overfertilization can also cause the plant to stop growing and produce new leaves.

How To Tell If You’ve Overfertilized Your Monstera Plant

You can look out for a few signs that indicate you’ve overfertilized your monstera plant.

These include:

  • Yellowing and wilting of lower leaves
  • Brown leaf tips or margins
  • Leaf drop
  • Stunted growth
  • Blackened roots

How To Save An Overfertilized Monstera Plant

If you think you’ve overfertilized your monstera, the first thing you should do is flush the soil with water.

This will help to remove some of the excess fertilizer from the soil.

To do this, water the plant thoroughly until water starts to come out of the drainage holes.

Let the plant drain for a few minutes, and then discard the excess water.

You should also stop fertilizing the plant until it has recovered from the overfertilization.

Only fertilize the plant during the growing season, and be sure only to use the recommended amount of fertilizer.

7. Root-Bound

Monstera plants can become root bound if kept in the same pot for too long.

This means the roots have filled up the pot and have started to crowd each other.

Root-bound plants cannot absorb enough nutrients and water, which can cause the leaves to turn yellow or brown and the plant to stop growing.

How To Tell If Your Monstera Is Root-Bound

You can look out for a few signs that indicate your monstera plant is root-bound.

These include:

  • Yellowing or browning leaves
  • Curling leaves
  • Roots circling the inside of the pot
  • Soil that is dry even after watering
  • Stunted growth

How To Save A Root-Bound Monstera Plant

If you think your monstera is root-bound, the best thing to do is to transplant it into a larger pot.

Make sure to use a pot that is only slightly larger than the current one, as a pot that is too large can cause the roots to rot.

It’s also essential to use fresh potting soil when transplanted.

You may also need to trim the roots to fit into the new pot.

8. Cold Temperatures

Monstera plants are tropical plants, which means they prefer warm temperatures.

If the temperature drops too low, it can cause the leaves to turn yellow or brown and the plant to stop growing.

The ideal temperature for monstera plants is between 60-85 degrees Fahrenheit.

How To Tell If Your Monstera Is Too Cold

You can look out for a few signs that indicate your monstera plant is too cold.

These include:

  • Yellowing or browning leaves
  • Leaf drop
  • Droopy leaves
  • Wilting
  • The plant turns black and mushy

How To Save A Monstera Plant That Is Too Cold

If you think your monstera is too cold, the best thing to do is to move it to a warmer location.

Ensure the new location has a temperature between 60-85 degrees Fahrenheit.

Place the plant in a spot that gets indirect sunlight and keep it away from drafts.

You may also need to provide the plant with additional humidity if the air is dry.

9. Hot Temperatures

Though monstera plants prefer warm temperatures, they can become stressed if the temperature gets too hot.

If the temperature rises above 85 degrees Fahrenheit, it can cause the leaves to turn yellow or brown and the plant to stop growing.

When a plant is exposed to high temperatures, the leaves lose water faster than the roots can take it up.

This causes the leaves to wilt and turn brown.

How To Tell If Your Monstera Is Too Hot

You can look out for a few signs that indicate your monstera plant is too hot.

These include:

  • Yellowing or browning leaves
  • Lower leaves falling off
  • Leaf drop
  • Wilting
  • Leaf edges turning brown and crispy

How To Save A Monstera Plant That Is Too Hot

If you think your monstera is too hot, the best thing to do is to move it to a cooler location.

Ensure the new location has a temperature between 60-85 degrees Fahrenheit.

You may also need to provide the plant with additional humidity if the air is dry.

You can improve the humidity around your plant by placing it on a pebble tray or using a humidifier.

10. Pests

Pests can also cause monstera plants to turn yellow or brown and stop growing.

The most common pests that attack monsteras are mealybugs, spider mites, and scale insects.

Mealybugs are small, white bugs that feed on plant sap.

Spider mites are tiny, red mites that spin webs on the undersides of leaves.

Scale insects are small, brown bugs that suck the sap out of plants.

All of these pests can cause the leaves to turn yellow or brown and the plant to stop growing.

How To Tell If Your Monstera Has Pests

There are a few signs you can look out for that indicate your monstera plant has pests.

These include:

  • Yellowing or browning leaves
  • Leaf drop
  • Holes in leaves
  • Distorted growth
  • Sticky leaves
  • Webbing on the undersides of leaves

How To Save A Monstera Plant With Pests

If you think your monstera plant has pests, the best thing to do is to treat it with a pesticide.

You can use a natural pesticide such as neem oil or insecticidal soap.

Make sure to follow the instructions on the label and apply the pesticide in the evening when the pests are less active.

You can also try to remove the pests by hand if they are visible.

Simply wipe them off with a damp cloth or use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol.

11. Diseases

Diseases can also cause monstera plants to turn yellow or brown and stop growing.

The most common diseases that attack monsteras are root rot, leaf spot, and powdery mildew.

Root rot is a fungal disease that attacks the roots of plants, causing them to turn brown and rot.

Leaf spot is a fungal disease that attacks the leaves of plants, causing them to turn brown and develop spots.

Powdery mildew is a fungal disease that covers the leaves of plants with a white powder.

Diseases often spread to plants when they are grown in wet, humid conditions.

How To Tell If Your Monstera Has A Disease

There are a few signs you can look out for that indicate your monstera plant has a disease.

These include:

  • Black or brown spots on the leaves
  • Leaves that are yellow or brown
  • White powder on the leaves
  • Roots that are brown or rotting
  • Stunted growth

How To Save A Monstera Plant With A Disease

If you think your monstera has a disease, the best thing to do is to treat it with a fungicide.

You can use a natural fungicide such as neem oil or baking soda.

You also need to remove any affected leaves or roots.

Sometimes, you may need to replace the potting mix if it is too infected.

To prevent diseases from spreading, disinfect your pruning tools after each use.

You can do this by dipping them in rubbing alcohol or a bleach solution.

Final Thoughts

A monstera plant is a beautiful addition to any home.

However, they can be a bit finicky and prone to problems if not cared for properly.

If your monstera plant is dying, don’t despair!

There are several things you can do to try to save it.

First, identify the problem and then take action accordingly.

With a bit of care and attention, you should be able to bring your houseplant back to good health in no time.