Overwatered Monstera: How To Identify, Treat and Prevent It

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If you have a Monstera plant, it’s important to learn how to identify overwatered Monstera.

This is because overwatered Monstera can lead to several problems, including root rot, leaf drop, and yellowing leaves.

Overwatering is a common problem with these plants, and it can be treated and prevented if you know what to look for.

Here we will discuss the signs of overwatered Monstera, how to treat it, and how to prevent it from happening in the future.

What Are the Risks of Overwatering Monstera Plants?

There are several risks associated with overwatering Monstera plants.

The most common is root rot, which can occur when the plant’s roots sit in water for too long.

This can cause the leaves to be yellow and drop off and the stem to soften and collapse.

Root rot is a serious problem and can kill a plant if not treated quickly.

Another risk of overwatering is fungal diseases, attacking the plant’s leaves and stem.

These diseases can cause the Monstera leaves to turn brown and drop off and the stem to rot.

They can also make the Monstera plant less able to tolerate drought conditions.

Overwatering can also lead to nutrient deficiencies, as the roots cannot absorb nutrients from the soil when they are waterlogged.

This can cause the leaves to turn yellow and fall off and cause the plant to become stunted.

Nutrient deficiencies can be difficult to diagnose and treat, so it is essential to prevent them from occurring in the first place.

Finally, overwatering can stress the Monstera plant and make it more susceptible to pests and diseases.

This is because the plant cannot take up water and nutrients properly, and its growth is stunted.

Stressed plants are also more likely to produce fewer and smaller leaves, and their stems may be weaker.

Overwatering is a severe problem that can cause many issues for Monstera plants.

If you think your plant is overwatered, it is important to take action quickly to prevent further damage.

How Does Overwatering a Monstera Occur?

Overwatering a Monstera plant can occur for a variety of reasons.

The most common reason is simply watering the plant too often.

Monstera plants need time to dry out between watering, and if they are watered too frequently, they will not have a chance to do so.

Overwatering can also occur if the pot does not have adequate drainage.

If water cannot drain away from the roots quickly, it will cause them to become waterlogged and lead to overwatering.

The potting soil can also play a role in overwatering. If it is too dense or does not allow for adequate drainage, it can lead to the plant becoming overwatered.

Another common cause of overwatering is using too much water.

When watering Monstera plants, use only enough water to moisten the soil and not drench it.

Drenching the soil can lead to overwatering, as the roots will not have a chance to dry out between watering.

What Does an Overwatered Monstera Look Like?

The first step in treating and preventing overwatering is to know how to tell if your Monstera is overwatered.

This can be tricky, as overwatering can cause various problems, and not all of them will be immediately apparent.

However, there are some signs that you can look out for that will indicate that your plant is overwatered.

Signs of an Overwatered Monstera

To tell if your Monstera is overwatered, look out for the following signs:

1. Yellow Leaves

If your Monstera leaves are turning yellow, this is a sign that it is overwatered.

Overwatered Monstera leaves typically turn yellow because the plant is not receiving enough oxygen.

When the roots of a plant are overwatered, they cannot properly absorb oxygen from the soil.

This lack of oxygen causes the Monstera leaves to turn yellow and eventually leads to the death of the plant.

While overwatering is the most common cause of yellow leaves on a Monstera, other factors such as nutrient deficiencies and pest infestations can also cause the leaves to turn yellow.

It is important to carefully monitor your plant for any other sign of overwatering before taking any corrective action.

If you notice that the leaves of your Monstera are turning yellow, it is essential to check the roots to see if they are overwatered.

To do this, simply remove the plant from its pot and examine the roots.

If they are waterlogged or have started to rot, this is a sign that your plant is overwatered.

If the roots look healthy, another factor such as a nutrient deficiency or pest infestation is likely causing the leaves to turn yellow.

2. Drooping Leaves

Another common sign of overwatering is drooping leaves.

An overwatered Monstera cannot absorb enough water from the soil, and the leaves will start to droop down as the plant tries to conserve water.

Eventually, the leaves will turn brown and dry out if the overwatering issue is not corrected.

Drooping leaves can also be caused by other factors such as heat stress, nutrient deficiencies, and pests.

Sometimes, overwatered plants will also have wilting or turning brown leaves.

If you see any of these signs, it is important to check the soil moisture level and take corrective action if necessary, as explained below.

3. Brown Spots on Leaves

Brown spots on the leaves of an overwatered Monstera are another common symptom.

These brown spots are caused by a lack of oxygen in the plant tissue.

When the roots of a plant are overwatered, they cannot properly absorb oxygen from the soil.

This lack of oxygen causes the leaves to turn brown and eventually leads to the death of the plant.

Brown spots on the leaves can also be caused by other factors such as nutrient deficiencies, pests, and diseases.

If you see brown spots on the leaves of your Monstera, it is essential to check for other signs of overwatering and check the roots to see if they are waterlogged or have started to rot.

If you notice any of these signs, it is important to take corrective action to prevent the overwatering from causing further damage to your plant.

4. Waterlogged Soil

One of the most telling signs of overwatering is waterlogged soil.

When the roots of a plant are overwatered, they cannot properly drain the excess water from the soil.

As a result, the soil becomes saturated with water and can no longer provide adequate drainage for the plant.

Waterlogged soil is often soggy, mushy, and dark in color.

It can also have a foul odor.

If you think your plant might be overwatered, it is essential to check the soil before taking any further action.

5. Root Rot

Root rot is another common symptom of overwatering.

Overwatered Monsteras often develop root rot, which is a severe condition that can lead to the death of the plant.

Root rot is caused by overwatering, which leads to excessive moisture in the soil.

This moisture then encourages the growth of fungal spores, which attack the plant’s roots.

The roots then start to decay, and the plant’s ability to uptake water and nutrients from the soil is severely impaired.

Root rot is often characterized by brown or black roots that are mushy to the touch.

If you think your plant has root rot, it’s essential to act quickly.

Remove the plant from the pot and inspect the roots.

If they are brown or black and mushy to the touch, your plant likely has root rot.

You can try to save the plant by trimming away the affected roots and replanting in fresh, well-draining soil.

However, if the roots are too far gone, it’s best to throw the plant out and start again.

6. Fungal Growth on the Soil

Overwatered Monsteras often develop fungal growth on the soil.

This is another telltale sign that your plant is overwatered.

Fungal growth is often white or gray and can appear as mold, mildew, or fungi.

It is important to note that some types of fungi are beneficial to plants, while others can be harmful.

If you see any fungal growth on the soil of your overwatered plant, it is important to take action to prevent the spread of the fungus.

To prevent the spread of harmful fungi, removing any affected leaves or stems from the plant is important.

You should also sterilize your tools before using them on other plants.

In some cases, you may need to use a fungicide to prevent the spread of the fungus.

7. Stems that are Soft or Brittle

One of the most common symptoms of overwatering is soft or brittle stems.

When a plant is overwatered, the waterlogged roots cannot properly absorb nutrients from the soil.

As a result, the plant’s stems become weak and can easily break.

In some cases, the stems may also start to rot.

If you notice that the stems of your overwatered Monstera are soft or brittle, it is important to take corrective action to prevent further damage to the plant.

It is important to support the plant with a stake or trellis to prevent the stems from breaking.

You can also improve the plant’s drainage by increasing the amount of airflow around the plant.

In some cases, you may need to repot the plant in a well-draining potting mix.

If the stems are too far gone, you may need to trim them back and hope new growth will appear.

How To Save an Overwatered Monstera

If you think your Monstera plant is overwatered, it is important to take action immediately.

There are a few steps you can take to try and save your plant.

First Step: Remove the Plant From the Pot

The first step is to remove the plant from the pot to check the roots.

If the roots are soggy or have started to rot, they will need to be trimmed back.

Rotting roots can spread to the rest of the plant, so it is important to remove them as soon as possible.

Clean the healthy roots with a rinse of water and allow them to dry before replanting the Monstera.

Second Step: Remove All the Soil

After you have trimmed back the roots, you will need to remove all the soil mix from the pot.

Wash the pot with soap and water to eliminate any bacteria or fungus that may be present.

Make sure to get rid of all the old soil, so your plant has a chance to start fresh.

Third Step: Trim Back the Foliage

The next step is to trim back the foliage.

Overwatered plants often have yellow or brown leaves.

Trimming back the foliage will allow the plant to focus its energy on the healthy parts of the plant.

Fourth Step: Check the Drainage

Make sure that your pot has drainage holes. If it does not, water will sit in the bottom of the pot and suffocate the roots.

If you have drainage holes, check to see if they are blocked. If they are, clear them so that water can drain properly.

Fifth Step: Repot in Fresh Soil

Once you have trimmed back the roots and foliage, you can repot your Monstera in fresh, well-draining soil.

Add a layer of rocks or gravel to the bottom of the pot to help with drainage.

Fill the pot with a high-quality potting mix and place your plant in the pot.

Leave a couple of inches between the potting mix and the pot’s rim to allow for watering.

Sixth Step: Allow the Plant to Dry Out

After taking all these steps, it is important to allow the plant to dry out completely before watering it again.

The best way to do this is to place the pot in a spot with bright indirect sunlight and wait for the soil to become completely dry.

Monstera plants need bright indirect light to thrive, but avoid placing them in direct sunlight, as this can scorch the leaves.

Seventh Step: Start a Regular Watering Schedule

Once the plant is dry, you can start a regular watering schedule.

Water the plant when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch.

Be sure to empty any water that collects in the saucer beneath the pot.

Eight Step: Monitor the Plant

Monitor the plant closely for any signs of overwatering.

If you see the leaves start to yellow or brown, or if the plant seems wilted, it is time to cut back on watering.

You can save your overwatered Monstera and get it back to health by following these steps.

How To Prevent Overwatering a Monstera

Preventing overwatering is key to keeping your Monstera plant healthy.

There are a few simple things you can do to make sure you don’t overwater your plant:

  • Only water Monstera plants when the soil is dry. Use your finger to feel the soil before watering.
  • Water slowly and evenly until water runs out of the drainage holes.
  • Don’t let your plant sit in water. Empty the saucer after watering.
  • Check that your pot has good drainage. If it doesn’t, repot into a pot with drainage holes.
  • Use a soil that drains well. A mixture of potting soil, perlite, and bark works well.
  • Don’t water your plant more than once a week. In winter, you may only need to water every two weeks.

By following these simple tips, you can help prevent overwatering and keep your Monstera happy and healthy.

Final Thoughts

Growing indoor plants can be very rewarding.

However, it’s important to remember that overwatering is one of the most common mistakes made when growing an indoor plant, and the Monstera is no exception.

Monsteras are tough plants and can tolerate a little overwatering.

However, if you overwater your plant regularly, it will eventually show signs of stress.

But, by learning how to water your Monstera plant properly, you can avoid overwatering and keep your plants healthy and happy.