Why Are My Hibiscus Leaves Turning Yellow? (11 Solutions)

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The Hibiscus, also known as rose mallow, hardy Hibiscus, and tropical Hibiscus plant, is a popular flowering plant known for its large, showy blooms.

Hibiscus flowers come in a wide range of colors, including orange, yellow, red, and pink.

The Hibiscus plant is native to tropical and subtropical regions around the world, and it’s a popular choice for gardens in warm climates.

One common issue that Hibiscus owners face is yellow leaves.

If you notice that your Hibiscus leaves turn yellow, it can be a symptom of several different problems.

Here are 10 possible reasons why your Hibiscus leaves turn yellow and what you can do to fix the issue.

Why Are My Hibiscus Leaves Turning Yellow and How Do I Fix It?

Hibiscus leaves turning yellow is a common problem that gardeners face.

There are several reasons why this might happen, but fortunately, there are also many other solutions.

Here are 10 possible reasons why your hibiscus leaves might be turning yellow and what you can do about it.

1. Lack of Water

If your hibiscus leaves are turning yellow, it could be a sign that the plant is not getting enough water.

Hibiscus plants are native to tropical and subtropical regions and need consistent watering to thrive.

When the soil is too dry, the leaves will begin to turn yellow and drop off.

This is because the plant cannot get the moisture it needs to stay healthy.

The best way to prevent this is to water Hibiscus plants regularly, ensuring that the soil stays moist but not soggy.

How To Fix It

Make sure to water your Hibiscus regularly, and if possible, try to give it a deep watering once a week.

This will help the plant develop a strong root system, which will be better able to withstand periods of drought.

If your plant is already showing signs of stress, you can try to revive it by giving it a good soaking.

Fill a sink or bucket with lukewarm water and place your hibiscus plant in it.

Let the plant soak for about 30 minutes, then remove it and allow it to drain thoroughly.

2. Overwatering

While lack of water can cause Hibiscus leaves to turn yellow, too much water can also be a problem.

Hibiscus plants are susceptible to root rot, which can occur when the roots are constantly wet.

This will prevent the plant from being able to absorb the nutrients it needs, causing the leaves to turn yellow and eventually drop off.

Also, if the soil does not drain well, the plant could be sitting in water, which prevents the roots from getting the oxygen they need.

To prevent overwatering, make sure to water your Hibiscus plants only when the soil is dry.

It’s also a good idea to water early in the day so that the plant has time to dry out before nightfall.

How To Fix It

If you think your plant might be overwatered, you should first check the soil.

If it feels soggy or wet, you are likely watering too often.

Try to allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings, and if possible, try to water Hibiscus plants in the morning so that the leaves have time to dry before nightfall.

If the plant is already showing signs of stress, you can try to revive it by watering less often and allowing the soil to dry out completely between waterings.

3. Not Enough Light

Hibiscus plants need a lot of light to thrive, and if they don’t get enough, the leaves will start to turn yellow.

This is because the plant cannot produce the food it needs to stay healthy.

Without enough light, Hibiscus plants will also become leggy and weak, and the flowers will be smaller and fewer in number.

To prevent this, place your Hibiscus plant in an area that gets at least six hours of direct sunlight each day.

If possible, try to give it even more light, encouraging better growth and more abundant Hibiscus flowers.

How To Fix It

If your Hibiscus plant is not getting enough light, the best thing you can do is move it to a brighter location.

If possible, try to give it six hours of direct sunlight each day.

If the plant is already showing signs of stress, you need to place it in an area that gets full sun as soon as possible.

4. Too Much Light

While Hibiscus plants need a lot of light to thrive, too much light can also be a problem.

If the leaves are getting direct sun for more than six hours a day, they can start to turn yellow and develop brown patches.

This is because the leaves are getting sunburned, and if the problem is not corrected, the leaves will eventually turn brown and drop off.

To prevent this, place your Hibiscus plant in an area where it will get some partial shade during the day, such as near a window or under a tree.

How To Fix It

If your Hibiscus plant is getting too much light, the best thing you can do is move it to a shadier location.

If possible, try to give it some protection from the sun during the day by placing it near a window or under a tree.

If the plant is already showing signs of stress, you can try to protect the leaves from the sun by covering them with a light cloth or placing them in a shady spot.

5. Nutrient Deficiency

Hibiscus plants need various nutrients to stay healthy, and if they don’t get enough of one or more of these nutrients, the leaves will start to turn yellow.

The most common nutrient deficiency in Hibiscus plants is iron, which can cause the leaves to turn yellow with green veins.

Other nutrient deficiencies that can cause yellowing leaves include magnesium, manganese, and zinc.

To prevent nutrient deficiencies, amend the soil with compost or organic fertilizer before planting and fertilize the plants regularly throughout the growing season.

How To Fix It

If your Hibiscus plant is showing signs of a nutrient deficiency, the best thing you can do is fertilize it with a balanced fertilizer.

It’s also a good idea to have your soil tested periodically to ensure it contains all the nutrients the plant needs.

Also, repotting the plant in fresh, amended soil can help correct a nutrient deficiency.

6. Temperature Stress

Hibiscus plants are tropical plants, and they prefer warm temperatures.

If the temperature drops too low, the leaves will start to turn yellow and drop off.

Hibiscus plants can tolerate temperatures as low as 50 degrees Fahrenheit, but they will not thrive in these conditions.

To prevent temperature stress, place your Hibiscus plant in an area where the temperature will stay above 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

How To Fix It

If your Hibiscus plant is experiencing temperature stress, the best thing you can do is move it to a warmer location.

If possible, try to find an area where the temperature will stay above 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

If the plant is already showing signs of stress, you may need to provide some additional warmth with a heat lamp or other similar device.

7. Transplant Shock

Hibiscus plants are very sensitive to transplanting, and they can often go into shock when they are moved to a new location.

This can cause the leaves to turn yellow and drop off.

When transplanting a Hibiscus plant, it’s essential to take special care not to damage the roots.

It’s common for the roots to be damaged when transplanting, so it’s important to be very careful.

To prevent transplant shock, make sure to handle the plant carefully and avoid damaging the roots.

It’s also good to water the plant well after transplanting and keep it in a shady spot until it recovers.

How To Fix It

If your Hibiscus plant is experiencing transplant shock, the best thing you can do is water it well and keep it in a shady spot until it recovers.

The plant will likely lose some leaves, but it should eventually recover.

If the roots were damaged during transplanting, you might need to replant the Hibiscus in fresh soil.

This helps prevent the plant from going into shock and allows it to recover more quickly.

8. Pest Infestation

Hibiscus plants are susceptible to various pests, and if they become infested, the leaves will start to turn yellow and drop off.

The most common pests that attack Hibiscus plants include aphids, mealybugs, whiteflies, and spider mites.

These pests suck the sap from the leaves, damaging them and causing them to turn yellow.

To prevent a pest infestation, check your Hibiscus plant regularly for signs of pests.

How To Fix It

If your Hibiscus plant is infested with pests, the best thing you can do is treat it with neem oil or insecticidal soap.

These products will kill the pests without harming the plant.

You may need to treat the Hibiscus multiple times to eliminate the pests.

You can also clean the leaves with a damp cloth to remove any pests clinging to them.

9. Root Rot

Root rot is a common problem for Hibiscus plants, and it can cause the leaves to turn yellow and drop off.

Root rot is caused by too much water, and it often affects Hibiscus plants that are grown in pots.

The plant roots start to rot and die, causing the leaves to turn yellow and drop off.

To prevent root rot, make sure to water your Hibiscus plant only when the soil is dry.

It’s also good to grow Hibiscus plants in pots with drainage holes to allow excess water to escape.

How To Fix It

If your Hibiscus plant is affected by root rot, the best thing you can do is remove it from the pot and replant it in fresh, dry soil.

You may also need to trim away any damaged or rotted roots.

You may also want to consider repotting the Hibiscus in a pot with drainage holes to allow excess water to escape.

10. Overfertilization

Hibiscus plants are susceptible to overfertilization, and if they are fertilized too much, the leaves will start to turn yellow.

They need to be fertilized only once a month during the growing season, and if they are fertilized more than that, the leaves will start to turn yellow.

Overfertilization can burn the plant’s roots and cause the leaves to turn yellow and drop off.

To prevent overfertilization, make sure to fertilize your Hibiscus plant only once a month during the growing season.

If you notice that the leaves are starting to turn yellow, stop fertilizing the plant and wait for the leaves to recover.

How To Fix It

If your Hibiscus plant is suffering from overfertilization, the best thing you can do is stop fertilizing it and wait for the leaves to recover.

You may also need to flush the soil with water to remove any excess fertilizer built up.

After a few weeks, the Hibiscus plant should start to recover, and the leaves should return to their normal color.

11. Natural Yellowing

Hibiscus leaves naturally turn yellow when they are old and ready to fall off.

This is a normal part of the plant’s life cycle, and it’s nothing to worry about.

The Hibiscus plant will produce new leaves to replace the ones that have fallen off.

How To Fix It

If your Hibiscus plant is naturally yellowing, there’s nothing you need to do.

Just wait for the leaves to fall off, and new ones will grow in their place.

Should I Remove Yellow Leaves From Hibiscus?

Hibiscus plants are known for their bright, vibrant flowers. However, sometimes the leaves of Hibiscus plants turn yellow.

While this may be alarming, there is usually no cause for concern.

There are a few reasons why Hibiscus leaves may turn yellow, including stress, lack of nutrients, or disease.

In most cases, the plant will recover on its own given some time.

However, if the leaves remain yellow and appear wilted or unhealthy, it is best to remove them from the plant.

This will help the Hibiscus to focus its energy on healthy growth and prevent the spread of diseases.

Why Are My Hibiscus Leaves Turning Yellow in Winter?

One of the most common reasons for Hibiscus leaves turning yellow is the plant’s natural response to the shorter days and cooler winter temperatures.

This is normal behavior and nothing to worry about.

The plant will likely go dormant during this time, so there is no need to take any action.

Just keep an eye on the plant and provide any necessary care, such as water and light.

If the leaves do not return to their normal color by spring, there may be another problem.

But if the leaves are beginning to turn yellow and it is still early in the winter, then there is no cause for concern.

Why Are My Hibiscus Leaves Turning Yellow Overnight?

One of the most alarming causes of Hibiscus leaves turning yellow is when it happens overnight.

The most common reason for this is stress.

Hibiscus plants are tropical plants and prefer warm, humid conditions.

If the plant is exposed to too much cold or heat, it will go into shock, and the leaves will turn yellow.

Other causes of stress include overwatering, underwatering, or a sudden change in light exposure.

If you suspect that stress is the cause of the Hibiscus yellow leaves, try to identify the source of the stress and take steps to alleviate it.

Why Are My Hibiscus Leaves Turning Yellow With Black Spots?

Hibiscus leaves turning yellow with black spots is a fungal disease symptom.

Fungal infections are most common in humid or wet conditions.

If you notice black spots on the leaves of your Hibiscus, it is essential to take action immediately.

Remove any affected leaves from the plant and dispose of them properly.

Treat the plant with a fungicide for at least two weeks to prevent the spread of the infection.

Quarantine the Hibiscus plant from other plants to prevent the infection from spreading.

Why Are My Hibiscus Leaves Turning Yellow With Brown Spots?

Hibiscus leaves turning yellow with brown spots is commonly caused by fertilizer burn.

This happens when the plant is over-fertilized, and the roots cannot absorb all of the nutrients.

The excess fertilizer will then build up in the leaves and cause them to turn yellow with brown spots.

If you think fertilizer burn is the problem, stop fertilizing the plant and flush the soil with water to remove any excess fertilizer.

The plant should recover within a few weeks.

Why Are My Hibiscus Leaves Turning Yellow And Falling Off?

Hibiscus leaves turning yellow and falling off can be caused by several different problems, including stress, pests, or disease.

If the leaves are only turning yellow, it is likely due to stress.

However, if the leaves turn yellow and fall off, it is most likely due to pests or disease.

Pests such as aphids, whiteflies, and mealybugs can cause Hibiscus leaves to turn yellow and fall off.

These pests suck the nutrients out of the leaves, causing damage that leads to yellowing and leaf loss.

Diseases such as powdery mildew and rust can also cause Hibiscus leaves to turn yellow and fall off.

If you think pests or diseases are the problem, inspect the plant carefully and look for signs of pests or disease.

Treat the plant accordingly with the appropriate insecticide or fungicide.

Why Are My Hibiscus Leaves Turning Yellow and Curling?

If the leaves on your Hibiscus are yellowing and curling, likely, they’re not getting enough water.

The leaves will turn yellow and then curl inward as the plant tries to conserve moisture.

If you think your Hibiscus is not getting enough water, check the soil to see if it is dry.

Water the plant deeply and regularly to prevent the leaves from turning yellow and curling.

You may also need to increase the humidity around the plant if it is growing in a dry environment.

Final Thoughts

Growing Hibiscus can be a rewarding experience.

However, it is essential to be aware of the different problems that can occur.

If you notice Hibiscus leaves turning yellow, take the time to diagnose the problem and take steps to fix it.

With proper care, your Hibiscus plant will thrive and produce beautiful blooms for years to come.