Why Are My Calathea Leaves Drooping? (9 Causes & Solutions)

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Underwatering is the most common cause of Calathea leaves drooping. When this happens, the plant’s roots are not receiving enough water to support its growth and health. The soil should be kept moist but not soggy; if it feels dry when you stick your finger in the soil, then it’s time to water your Calathea.

You’re not alone if you’ve noticed that your Calathea leaves have been drooping lately.

Calathea, commonly known as the prayer plant, is a common houseplant found in many homes. Unfortunately, they’re prone to drooping leaves.

This is a common problem with Calatheas, with several causes and solutions.

Here we will discuss the most common causes of Calathea leaves drooping and how to fix them.

Why Do Calathea Leaves Droop?

The Calathea is a popular indoor plant known for its beautiful, dark green leaves.

However, Calatheas are also prone to drooping leaves, which can be a frustrating problem for plant owners.

Here are the most common causes of Calathea leaves drooping and how to fix them:

Underwatering

Underwatering is the most common reasons of Calathea drooping leaves.

When the soil is too dry, it prevents the plant from absorbing the moisture it needs to stay hydrated.

As a result, the leaves begin to wilt and droop.

Underwatered Calathea plants are often exacerbated by high temperatures and low humidity levels, which can cause the plant to lose even more water.

How To Fix It

If your Calathea plant is drooping due to underwatering, the easiest solution is to water it more often.

Calathea plants need to be watered at least once a week, but you may need to water them more often if the weather is hot or dry.

Check the soil before watering, and make sure it is moist but not wet or soggy.

Make sure to give the plant a good drink of water until the soil is wet down to the bottom of the pot.

Overwatering

Overwatering is another common cause of Calathea drooping leaves.

An overwatered Calathea typically happens when the plant cannot absorb all the water provided, and the excess moisture begins to cause the droopy leaves.

In some cases, the Calathea leaves may even turn yellow or brown.

How To Fix It

If your Calathea leaves are drooping due to overwatering, the solution is to water it less often.

Calatheas only need to be watered once a week, and you may even be able to go up to two weeks without watering them if the weather is cool and dry.

Check the soil before watering, and ensure it is slightly dry to the touch before you water it again.

If you’re having trouble determining whether or not your Calathea needs water, there are several ways to test it.

One way is to stick your finger in the soil. If the soil is wet, don’t water it.

Another way is to use a moisture meter to measure the humidity levels in the air.

If the humidity levels are below 50%, you can water your Calathea.

You can also check the water level in the pot. If the water is above the soil line, don’t water it.

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Low Humidity

Calatheas are native to tropical rainforests, so they prefer high humidity levels.

In low humidity environments, the plant will experience stress, which can cause drooping leaves.

This problem is often compounded by dry air, which can cause the plant to lose even more water.

In our homes, however, the air is typically much drier, which can cause Calathea leaves to become curl up at the edges.

Calathea leaves are sensitive to dry air and will start to droop if the humidity level drops below 40%.

How To Fix It

If your Calathea is drooping due to low humidity, the solution is to increase the humidity levels in your home.

You can use a humidifier or place the plant near a water source, such as a fish tank or fountain.

You can also mist the leaves of the plant with water every day.

If you’re having trouble keeping the humidity levels in your home high enough, you can also try growing Calatheas in a terrarium.

Temperature Stress

Temperature stress is a common problem for Calathea plants and can cause droopy leaves.

The leaves of Calathea plants are susceptible to temperature changes, and they will droop if the temperature is too low or too high.

The ideal temperature for Calathea plants is between 65 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit. If the temperature drops below 60 degrees Fahrenheit, the leaves will droop.

If the temperature rises above 80 degrees Fahrenheit, the leaves will also start to droop.

Calathea plants need a consistent temperature to stay healthy, so if the temperature fluctuates too much, it can cause the leaves to droop.

How To Fix It

If your Calathea is drooping due to temperature stress, the solution is to keep the temperature consistent.

You can do this by using a thermostat to regulate the temperature in your home, or you can move the plant to a cooler or warmer room.

You can also place the plant in front of a window where it will get direct sunlight or move it to a shaded area.

If you’re having trouble keeping the temperature consistent, you can use a grow light to supplement the natural light.

Light Stress

There are a few reasons light stress may cause Calathea leaves to droop.

One reason is that the plant is not getting enough light.

If the leaves are drooping toward the light source, this is a sign that the plant is not getting enough light and needs to be moved to a brighter location.

Another reason for Calathea drooping leaves may be that the plant is getting too much direct sunlight.

Calathea leaves are delicate and can scorch easily in direct sunlight, causing them to droop.

If the leaves are scorched or browned, this is a sign that the plant needs to be moved to a location with indirect or filtered light.

How To Fix It

If your Calathea is drooping due to light stress, the solution is to move the plant to a brighter or shadier location.

Calathea plants need bright indirect light, so place them where they will get plenty of natural light.

You can also use a grow light to supplement the natural light.

If the leaves are drooping towards the light source, you can also try rotating the plant every few days so that all of the leaves get an equal amount of sunlight.

Overfertilization

If your Calathea is drooping, it may be because you’re overfertilizing it.

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When Calathea plants are overfertilized, the leaves typically turn yellow and droop.

This is because the Calathea plant cannot process the excess nutrients, which causes stress on the plant.

In addition to causing droopy leaves, overfertilization can lead to root rot and other problems.

How To Fix It

If your Calathea is drooping due to overfertilization, the solution is to stop fertilizing it.

Wait until the leaves have returned to their normal color before you start fertilizing them again.

You can also flush the potting soil mix with water to help remove any excess nutrients.

Calathea plants don’t need a lot of fertilizer, so only fertilize it when it’s needed.

It would be best to fertilize Calathea plants once a month during the growing season (spring and summer).

Use a water-soluble fertilizer at half the recommended dosage.

Adjusting To a New Environment

If your Calathea is drooping, it may be adjusting to its new location.

When Calatheas are transplanted or moved to a new location, they often experience stress as they adapt to their new surroundings.

This stress can cause the leaves to droop and lose their color.

Additionally, Calatheas are sensitive to changes in light and temperature, so a sudden change in either of these can cause the leaves to droop.

How To Fix It

If your Calathea is drooping because it’s adjusting to a new environment, the solution is to be patient.

The plant will eventually adjust to its new surroundings, and the leaves will return to their normal color.

You can help speed up the process by gradually introducing the plant to its new location.

You can also keep the temperature and light consistent in the new location.

Calathea plants will eventually adjust to their new environment with the proper care.

Root Rot

If your Calathea is drooping, it may be because of root rot.

Root rot is caused by excessive moisture, which can cause the plant’s roots to suffocate and die.

As the roots die, they cannot provide the plant with the water and nutrients it needs to survive.

As a result, the leaves begin to droop and turn brown.

How To Fix It

If you think your Calathea may have root rot, it’s essential to act quickly.

Remove the plant from its pot and check the roots for signs of decay. If they are black or mushy, they will need to be removed.

Allow the plant to dry out entirely before replanting it in new soil.

Make sure to water the plant sparingly until its roots have grown back.

Root rot can be fatal to Calathea plants, so acting quickly is essential if you think your plant has it.

Pest Infestation

If your Calathea is drooping, it may be because of a pest infestation.

Aphids, spider mites, and mealybugs are all common pests that can attack Calatheas.

These pests suck the sap out of the leaves, causing them to turn yellow and eventually drop off.

In addition to causing leaf drop, pest infestations can lead to fungal diseases such as powdery mildew and leaf spot.

How To Fix It

If you think your Calathea has a pest infestation, the best thing to do is isolate it from other plants.

This will prevent the pests from spreading to other plants.

You can treat the infestation with neem oil or insecticidal soap but read the instructions carefully.

Pest infestations can be challenging to get rid of, so it may take multiple treatments to get rid of them.

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Also, clean the area around the plant to remove any eggs or pests that may be hiding.

If you catch a pest infestation early, it can be treated relatively easily.

FAQ

Should I Cut Off Drooping Calathea Leaves?

No, it would be best if you did not cut off drooping Calathea leaves.

The leaves may droop for various reasons, such as being too dry or too wet.

If you cut off the leaves, you may damage the plant and make it harder for the Calathea to recover.

Try watering the plant more often if it seems to be drooping due to being too dry.

If the leaves are drooping due to being too wet, try waiting a few days before watering the plant again.

You can also place the Calathea where it will receive less sunlight until the leaves stop drooping.

Why Are My Calathea Leaves Drooping After Repotting?

It is not unusual for Calathea leaves to droop after being repotted.

This is because the plant is adjusting to its new pot and soil.

The leaves should stop drooping within a few days.

If the leaves continue to droop, it may mean that the plant is not getting enough water or that the pot is too large.

You can try watering the plant more often or using a smaller pot.

Why Are My Calathea Leaves Drooping and Curling?

There are several reasons why Calathea leaves may droop and curl.

One possibility is that the plant needs more water.

Another possibility is that pests or diseases are attacking the plant.

When Calathea leaves droop and curl, it is often a sign that something is wrong with the plant.

You need to identify the cause of the problem and take corrective action.

For example, if the plant is not getting enough water, you must water it more often.

If the leaves are drooping and curling due to a pest or disease, you may need to treat the plant with neem oil or a fungicide.

Why Are My Calathea Leaves Drooping at Night?

It is not unusual for Calathea leaves to droop at night.

This is because the plant absorbs more water from the soil at night.

The leaves should stop drooping within a few hours after sunrise.

If the leaves continue to droop, it may mean that the plant is not getting enough water or needs more sunlight.

You can try watering the plant more often or moving it to a location that will receive more sunlight.

Final Thoughts

Calathea care is not complex, but there are a few things to keep in mind to ensure your indoor plant remains healthy and happy.

Calatheas like high humidity, so misting the leaves regularly is a must.

They also prefer indirect sunlight, so if you’re keeping your plant near a window, make sure it’s not in direct sunlight.

And finally, if your Calathea’s leaves start to droop, don’t worry – it’s usually just a sign that it needs some water.

Just be sure to give it a good soak, and then keep an eye on it to ensure the problem doesn’t recur.

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