Why Are My Succulent Leaves Drooping? (9 Causes and Solutions)

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If you’ve been noticing that your succulent has been looking a bit droopy lately, you’re not alone.

Many succulent owners find themselves asking why is my succulent drooping?

This is a common problem with these plants, and there are several causes.

In this article, we’ll discuss the nine most common reasons why succulent leaves droop, as well as how to fix a droopy succulent.

Why Is My Succulent Drooping?

When succulent leaves droop, it’s usually a sign that something is wrong with the plant.

There are several reasons why succulents might droop, including watering issues, light problems, and temperature changes.

The problem can be fixed by addressing the underlying issue in most cases.

Below, we’ll discuss the nine most common reasons succulent leaves droop, as well as how to fix each problem.

Overwatering

An overwatered succulent is one of the most common reasons why leaves droop.

Succulents are drought-tolerant plants, so they don’t need a lot of water. If you give them too much water, their roots will rot, and the succulents will die.

Succulents need to be watered only when the soil is dry to the touch. If you’re unsure if your succulent needs water, wait until the top inch of soil is dry before watering again.

They usually need water only once a week, but this varies depending on the size of the pot, the type of succulent, and the climate.

Besides drooping leaves, other common signs of an overwatered succulent are:

How to Fix It

If your succulent is overwatered, the first thing you need to do is water it less often. Cut back on watering by half and see if that fixes the problem.

If the succulent is in a pot, make sure the pot has drainage holes so the water can escape. This will help excess water escape, so the roots don’t rot.

Also, use a proper potting soil for succulents. A regular potting soil will hold too much water and lead to root rot. A cactus potting soil or succulent potting mix is a good option.

If you’ve been overwatering your succulent for a while, there’s a good chance the roots have already rotted.

In that case, you’ll need to repot the succulent with fresh soil. Be sure to get rid of all the old soil and water the succulent very sparingly until it recovers.

Underwatering

An underwatered succulent is another common reason why leaves droop.

Although succulents need less water than other plants, they still need some water to stay healthy.

If your succulent isn’t getting enough water, the leaves will droop as a way of conserving water.

Succulents usually need water about once a week, but this will vary depending on the climate and other factors.

Other common signs of an underwatered succulent are:

  • Wilting
  • Brown or crispy leaves
  • Shriveled leaves
  • Dry soil
  • Slow growth

How to Fix It

If you think your succulent isn’t getting enough water, the first thing to do is check the soil.

If the soil is dry, give your succulent a good watering.

Ensure to water the plant until the water starts flowing out of the drainage hole at the bottom of the pot.

You can also test whether your succulent needs water by sticking your finger in the soil.

If the soil is dry up to your first knuckle, it’s time to water your succulents.

If the soil is wetter than that, you can wait a few more days before watering.

Once you’ve established how often should you water your succulent, make sure to water it at that frequency.

Too Much Sun or Heat

Another common reason why succulent leaves droop is too much sun or heat.

Succulents need a lot of sunlight, but they can’t handle direct sunlight for too long.

If your succulent is in direct sunlight for too long, the leaves will droop as a way of protecting themselves from the heat.

In addition to drooping leaves, succulents in too much sun or heat can also:

How to Fix It

If you think your succulent is in too much sun, the first thing to do is move it to a shadier spot.

Succulents thrive in bright indirect sunlight, so try to find a spot that’s in the shade but still gets some light.

Succulent plants need at least four hours of direct sunlight a day.

If you can’t move your succulent to a shadier spot, try using a shade cloth to protect it from the sun.

When growing succulents indoors, place them in an east- or west-facing window.

This will give them morning or afternoon sun, and they will be in the shade during the hottest part of the day.

When growing succulents outdoors, place them in a spot where they will get morning or afternoon sun. Succulents can’t tolerate direct sunlight for long periods.

If your succulent is in too much heat, try to move it to a cooler spot.

Succulents don’t do well in extreme temperatures, so make sure the temperature is comfortable for them.

If you can’t move your succulent to a cooler spot, try using a fan to cool it down.

Too Little Sunlight

Another common reason why succulent leaves droop is too little sunlight.

Succulents need a lot of sunlight, but they can’t handle direct sunlight for too long.

If your succulent isn’t getting enough light, the leaves will droop as a way of conserving energy.

Common signs of too little sun are:

How to Fix It

If you think your succulent isn’t getting enough sunlight, the first thing to do is move it to a sunnier spot.

Succulents thrive in bright indirect sunlight, so try to find a spot that’s in the sun but still gets some shade.

Succulent plants need at least four hours of direct sunlight a day, so make sure to place them in a spot where they will get plenty of sunlight.

If you can’t move your succulent to a sunnier spot, try using a grow light to give it some extra light.

Another option is to move your succulent outdoors during the summer when it will get more sunlight.

Succulents can’t tolerate direct sunlight for long periods, so make sure to provide them with plenty of indirect sunlight.

Temperature Fluctuations

Succulents are sensitive to changes in temperature and can droop or wilt as a result.

If you’ve recently moved your succulent from one room to another, or if the temperature in your home has been fluctuating a lot, this is likely why your succulent leaves are drooping.

Succulents need a consistent temperature of around 65-75 degrees Fahrenheit to stay healthy.

If the temperature is too high or too low, your succulent will start to show signs of stress.

Other factors that can affect the temperature and cause succulents to droop include drafts, direct sunlight, and being near a heat source.

How to Fix It

If your succulent is drooping due to fluctuations in temperature, try moving it to a location where the temperature is more consistent.

If possible, try to avoid exposing your succulent plant to extreme temperatures.

If you live in a climate where the temperature can drop below 65 degrees Fahrenheit, you may need to bring your succulent indoors during the cold winter months.

If you live in a climate where the temperature can get above 75 degrees Fahrenheit, try to find a location in your home that provides some shade. This will help keep your succulent temperature more consistent.

If you’re having trouble keeping the temperature in your home consistent, you may want to consider investing in a thermostat that can be programmed to maintain a set temperature.

Root Rot

Root rot is a common problem that can cause succulent leaves to droop.

The roots of a succulent can become infected with fungus or bacteria, which will cause the plant to wilt and die.

Other symptoms of root rot include:

  • Black or brown roots
  • Foul odor coming from the plant
  • Leaves that are soft and mushy

How to Fix It

If you think your succulent may have root rot, the best thing to do is remove the plant from its pot and inspect the roots.

If the roots are black or brown or smell foul, then the plant has root rot and needs to be treated.

Remove all the soil from the roots and cut away any infected parts of the root. You may also need to repot your succulent in a new pot with fresh soil.

Be sure to keep your succulent in a location where it will get plenty of sunlight.

Root rot can be caused by overwatering, so make sure you’re not watering your succulents too often.

Only water succulents when the soil is dry.

If you’re having trouble treating root rot, you may want to consider using a fungicide, such as hydrogen peroxide to treat the infection.

You can mix one part 3% hydrogen peroxide with two parts water should be mixed carefully in a watering can or spray bottle and poured over the plant’s root system.

Over Fertilizing

Succulent plants are sensitive to over-fertilizing and can start to droop as a result. Succulents need very little fertilizer and can be over-fertilized very easily.

When you fertilize your succulent, you’re providing it with nutrients that it needs to grow.

If you give your succulent too much fertilizer, it will start to absorb the excess nutrients and will eventually start to droop.

Other common signs of over-fertilizing include:

  • Yellow leaves
  • Slow growth
  • Lose of dead leaves

How to Fix It

If you think your succulent has been over-fertilized, the best thing to do is stop fertilizing it altogether.

Let the soil dry out completely before watering it again. You may also want to repot your succulents in fresh soil.

Be sure only to fertilize your succulent when it is actively growing.

Succulents typically go through a growth spurt in the spring and summer, so this is the best time to fertilize them.

If you’re having trouble knowing how much fertilizer to give your succulent, try using a diluted solution of liquid fertilizer at half the recommended strength.

Insects or Pests

Insects or pests can also be a common cause of succulent leaves drooping.

Insects like aphids, mealybugs, and spider mites can attach themselves to the succulent leaves and suck the sap out of the plant.

This will cause the leaves to wilt and droop. It’s essential to get rid of any pests on your succulent as soon as possible to prevent further damage.

Other signs of an infestation include:

  • Swarms of insects around the plant
  • Sticky honeydew on the leaves and stems
  • Mites or webbing on the leaves

How to Fix It

If you think your succulent has been infested with pests, the best thing to do is remove the plant from its pot and inspect it closely.

If you see any insects or pests, use an organic insecticide to get rid of them.

You can also try washing the plant’s leaves with a strong stream of water to wash away any pests or honeydew.

Be sure to keep your succulent in a location where it will get plenty of sunlight. Sunlight will help kill any insects or pests that may be on the plant.

If you’re having trouble getting rid of the pests, you may want to consider using a horticultural oil or soap.

You can also use one part dish soap to ten parts water should be mixed in a spray bottle and sprayed on the succulent leaves.

Be sure to avoid getting the soap in the plant’s soil, as it will kill the succulent.

Transplant Shock

Transplant shock is another common reason why succulent leaves droop.

When you transplant a succulent, you’re essentially moving it from one pot to another.

This can be a traumatic experience for the succulent and cause the leaves to droop or wilt.

Transplanting a succulent can also cause the roots to rot.

This is because when you transplant a succulent, the succulent’s roots may not get enough oxygen in the new soil and will start to rot.

How to Fix It

If you think your succulent is in transplant shock, the best thing to do is give it some time. The succulent will eventually start to recover and will resume growing normally.

After repotting a succulent, don’t water it for at least a week. This will allow the succulent’s roots to re-establish themselves in the new pot.

Be sure to use a well-draining soil when repotting your succulents. A succulent’s roots need plenty of air to grow and will rot if they’re constantly wet.

If you see any signs of the succulent’s roots rotting, stop watering it immediately and wait for the roots to heal.

You may also want to repot the succulent in fresh soil.

Make sure only to transplant your succulent during its growing season. Succulents typically go through a growth spurt in the spring and summer, so this is the best time to transplant them.

Final Thoughts

Succulents are hardy plants that can thrive with a little bit of care and attention.

If you are experiencing problems with your succulents, such as drooping leaves, there is probably a specific reason why.

By troubleshooting the issue, you can usually get your succulent back on track in no time.

Remember to be patient and take things slow. Recovering from succulent drooping can take a little time.