How To Fix a Leggy Pothos Plant (An Easy Guide)

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Pothos plants are one of the most popular houseplants, for a good reason! They’re easy to care for, beautiful, and can thrive in a wide range of conditions.

But even the most easy-going plant can have problems from time to time, and one common problem pothos plants face is leggy growth.

A leggy pothos has long, spindly stems with very few leaves. This problem is usually caused by too little light, but it can also be caused by overfertilization.

Luckily, leggy pothos plants are easy to fix!

In this article, you will find everything you need to know about leggy pothos plants, including their causes and how to fix them.

What Causes a Pothos Plant to Become Leggy?

Two primary reasons a pothos plant might become leggy are too little light and overfertilization.

Too Little Light

Pothos plants are native to the tropical forests of Southeast Asia, where they grow as climbers on trees and other tall structures. In their natural habitat, they receive dappled sunlight throughout the day.

Pothos plants that are grown indoors often do not receive enough light, which can cause them to become leggy. If your pothos plant is not getting enough light, you will notice that the stems are stretching out towards the light source in an attempt to get more light.

To fix this problem, move your pothos plant to a location where it will receive more light. If possible, place it in a spot where it will receive indirect sunlight for at least part of the day.

Overfertilization

Another common reason for leggy pothos plants is overfertilization.

When a pothos plant is fertilized too often, the excess nutrients can cause the plant to grow too quickly.

This rapid growth results in long, spindly stems that are weak and unable to support the weight of the pothos leaves.

If you think your pothos plant might be overfertilized, the first thing you should do is stop fertilizing it. Once you have stopped fertilizing, flush the soil with water to remove any excess nutrients.

How To Tell If a Pothos Plant Is Leggy?

There are a few key signs to look for if you think your pothos plant might be leggy:

The Stems Are Long and Spindly

If the stems of your pothos plant are long and spindly, it is likely that the plant is not getting enough light.

In low light conditions, pothos plants will stretch out towards the light in an attempt to get more light. This stretching causes the stems to become long and thin.

It can be helpful to compare the stems of your pothos plant to those of a healthy plant. The plant is likely leggy if the stems are much thinner and longer than usual.

There Are Few Leaves

Another sign of a leggy pothos plant is the number of leaves.

Pothos plants that are not getting enough light will produce fewer leaves than healthy plants.

You may also notice that the pothos leaves are smaller than usual and have a pale color.

If you think your pothos plant might be leggy, look at its number of leaves. The plant is likely leggy if there are fewer leaves than normal.

The Leaves Are Small and Spaced Far Apart

Leggy pothos plants will also have tiny leaves that are spaced far apart.

This is because the plant is not getting enough light, which causes the leaves to be smaller than usual.

The lack of light also causes the plant to produce fewer leaves, which means the leaves are spaced further apart than they would be on a healthy plant.

If you notice that the leaves on your pothos plant are small and spaced far apart, the plant is likely leggy.

The Plant Is Not Growing New Leaves

Pothos plants not getting enough light will also have trouble growing new leaves.

Light is essential for the plant to produce chlorophyll, which is necessary for photosynthesis.

Without enough light, the plant cannot produce new leaves.

If your pothos plant is not growing new leaves, it is likely that it is not getting enough light.

The Leaves Are Drooping

Leggy pothos plants will often have drooping leaves.

This is because the stems are not strong enough to support the weight of the leaves.

The leaves will also be smaller than usual and may have a pale color.

If you notice that the leaves on your pothos plant are drooping, the plant is likely leggy.

The Plant Looks Unhealthy

In general, leggy pothos plants will look unhealthy.

The leaves will be small and spaced far apart, and the plant may not be growing new leaves.

The stems will be long and spindly, and the leaves may be drooping.

A healthy pothos plant will have thick, green leaves and strong stems.

If your pothos plant looks unhealthy, it is likely leggy.

How To Fix a Leggy Pothos Plant

There are a few things you can do to fix a leggy pothos plant:

Provide More Light

The most important thing you can do for a leggy pothos plant is to provide it with more light.

Pothos plants need bright indirect light to thrive. If your plant is not getting enough light, it will become leggy.

The best way to provide more light for your plant is to move it to a brighter spot. However, be sure to do this gradually so the plant can adjust to the new light conditions.

Pothos plants need at least 4 hours of bright indirect light each day. If possible, provide your plant with more light than this.

Be careful not to place the plant in direct sunlight, damaging the leaves.

Prune the Plant

Pruning is another way to fix a leggy pothos plant.

Pruning will help to encourage the plant to grow new, healthy leaves.

To prune your plant, cut off any yellow or brown leaves.

You can also cut off any stems that are longer than you want them to be.

Be sure to use sharp, clean scissors when pruning your plant.

After pruning, place the plant in a bright spot to start growing new leaves.

Don’t Overfertilize

Overfertilizing can also cause pothos plants to become leggy.

Too much fertilization or high nitrogen fertilizers will encourage fast growth, which can cause the plant to become leggy.

If you think your plant might be overfertilized, stop fertilizing it and flush the soil with water to remove any excess fertilizer.

Once you have done this, the plant should grow new, healthy leaves.

Pothos plants must be fertilized every 2-4 weeks during the growing season.

During the winter, they only need to be fertilized once a month.

Use a balanced fertilizer that is low in nitrogen.

Repot the Plant

If your leggy pothos is caused by overfertilization, you may need to repot the plant.

This will help to remove any excess fertilizer from the soil and give the plant a fresh start.

Choose a new pot slightly larger than the old one to repot your plant.

Remove the plant from its old pot and carefully remove any excess potting soil.

Place the plant in the new pot and fill it with fresh, well-draining potting mix.

Water the plant well and place it in a bright spot.

Pothos plants should be repotted every 12-18 months.

Give Your Plant Time

It can take some time for a leggy pothos plant to recover.

If you provide the plant with the care it needs, it should start to grow new, healthy leaves within a few weeks.

Be patient and give your plant time to adjust to its new environment.

How to Prune a Leggy Pothos Plant

If your pothos plant looks leggy, it’s probably because it isn’t getting enough light.

Leggy plants are often long and spindly, with leaves that are far apart from each other. They can be unsightly and difficult to manage.

The good news is that leggy pothos plants are easy to fix. All you need to do is prune them back.

Pruning will encourage the plant to grow fuller and more compact. It’s a simple solution that can make a big difference in the appearance of your plant.

Here’s how to prune a leggy pothos plant:

  1. Cut the leggy stems back to the point where they branch off.
  2. Remove any leaves that are yellow or brown.
  3. Cut back any stems that are longer than 12 inches.
  4. Leave at least 2-3 leaves on each stem.
  5. Use sharp, clean pruning shears to avoid damaging the plant.
  6. Prune regularly to maintain the shape of your plant and prevent it from becoming leggy again.

Pruning is a simple and effective way to fix a leggy pothos plant.

Regularly trimming back the long and spindly stems can encourage the plant to grow fuller and more compact.

Keep your pruning shears sharp and clean to avoid damaging the plant, and enjoy the healthy and attractive growth of your pothos plant.

How to Repot Leggy Pothos Plants

Leggy pothos plants are often the result of too much fertilizer.

If your plant looks leggy, it’s probably because it’s overfertilized.

The good news is that you can quickly fix this problem by repotting the plant.

Repotting will help to remove any excess fertilizer from the soil and give the plant a fresh start.

Here’s how to repot a leggy pothos plant:

  1. Choose a new pot that is slightly larger than the old one.
  2. Remove the plant from its old pot and carefully remove any excess soil.
  3. Place the plant in the new pot and fill it with fresh, well-draining potting mix.
  4. Don’t water the plant for a day or two to allow the roots to adjust to their new environment.
  5. After a few days, water the plant well and place it in a bright spot.

Pothos plants should be repotted every 12-18 months.

If your leggy pothos plant is caused by overfertilization, repotting is the best way to fix the problem.

How To Propagate Leggy Pothos Plants

Leggy pothos plants can be easily propagated by cuttings.

All you need to do is take a cutting from the leggy plant and place it in a water or moist potting mix.

The cutting will root within a few weeks and can then be transplanted into a pot.

Here’s how to propagate leggy pothos plants:

  1. Cut a stem from the leggy plant, including at least 2-3 leaves.
  2. Remove the bottom leaves from the cutting and place it in water or moist potting mix.
  3. Change the water or potting mix every few days to keep it fresh.
  4. After a few weeks, the cutting will have rooted and can be transplanted into a pot.

Propagating leggy pothos plants is a great way to create new plants.

It’s also an easy and inexpensive way to fix a leggy plant.

You can create full, healthy plants that will thrive in your home by taking cuttings and propagating them.

How To Prevent a Leggy Pothos Plant

You can do a few simple things to prevent your pothos plant from becoming leggy.

Here are a few tips:

Give Your Plant Plenty of Light

Pothos plants need bright, indirect light to thrive.

If your plant is not getting enough light, it will become leggy as it stretches towards the light.

To prevent this, make sure to give your plant plenty of light.

You can place it near a window or in a room with bright, indirect light.

An east- or west-facing window is ideal.

A pothos plant needs at least 4 hours of bright, indirect sunlight each day.

Turn Your Plant Regularly

Another way to prevent your pothos plant from becoming leggy is to turn it regularly.

Pothos plants tend to grow towards the light, so turning the plant will help it to grow evenly.

Every week or so, turn the plant a quarter turn so that it gets evenly lit on all sides.

This will help it to grow evenly and prevent it from becoming leggy.

Trim Your Plant Regularly

Trimming the plant regularly will also help to prevent it from becoming leggy.

Trimming back the long and spindly stems can encourage the plant to grow fuller and more compact.

Keep your pruning shears sharp and clean to avoid damaging the plant, and enjoy the healthy and attractive growth of your pothos plant.

Repot Your Plant Every Year or Two

Repotting your plant every year or two will also help to prevent it from becoming leggy.

When you repot the plant, you can add fresh potting mix and remove any excess fertilizer that may be causing the plant to become leggy.

Repotting will also help to aerate the roots and encourage new growth.

Choose a pot slightly larger than the old one, and use a fresh, well-draining potting mix.

Don’t Overfertilize

Overfertilizing is one of the most common causes of leggy plants.

When you fertilize your plant, use a diluted fertilizer to half-strength.

Applying too much fertilizer can cause the plant to become leggy and weak.

Fertilize your plant every two weeks during the growing season and monthly during the winter.

Final Thoughts

If your pothos plant looks leggy, you can do a few things to help it.

First, try moving it to a brighter location.

If that doesn’t help, you can also try cutting back the stems to encourage new growth.

Finally, ensure you’re not overfertilizing your plant, which can also cause leggy growth.

With patience and care, your pothos plant will look lush and healthy in no time!