Why Are My Pothos Leaves Drooping? (7 Causes & Solutions)

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Pothos plants are popular indoor plants because they’re easy to care for and thrive in various conditions

But even the most low-maintenance plant can have problems from time to time, and one of the most common is drooping leaves.

Although it may seem like your plant is dying, there are a few things you can do to revive it.

In this article, we’ll discuss the seven most common reasons for drooping Pothos leaves and what you can do to fix the problem.

Why Are My Pothos Leaves Drooping and How Can You Fix It?

Pothos plants are known for being tough and resilient, but they can even have problems. One of the most common issues is drooping leaves.

There are a few reasons this might happen, but the good news is that it’s usually easy to fix.

Here are the seven most common causes of drooping Pothos leaves and what you can do about them:

1. Lack of Water

Pothos plants are notoriously known for being drought tolerant.

However, this does not mean they do not need water.

If you notice your Pothos leaves drooping, it is most likely due to a lack of water.

While Pothos can survive without being watered for extended periods, they will not thrive.

Water helps carry sugar and other nutrients through the plant. If there is not enough water, the plant will be malnourished and unable to stand on its own.

How To Tell If Your Pothos Plant Needs Water

Pothos plants are pretty tough and can withstand periods of drought, but if you want your plant to stay healthy, it’s essential to give it the water it needs.

Here are a few signs that your pothos plant is underwatered:

  • Pothos leaves drooping: One of the first signs of dehydration is drooping leaves. If you notice that your Pothos leaves are wilting or looking limp, it’s time to give your plant a drink.
  • Pothos leaves turning brown: Another sign that your Pothos needs water is browning leaves. If the tips or edges of the leaves start to turn brown, it’s a sign that the plant is not getting enough moisture.
  • Pothos leaves becoming dry and crisp: Over time, dehydrated Pothos leaves will become dry and crisp. You may also notice wrinkles or creases in the leaves. If your plant is struggling, give it a good watering.

How To Treat An Underwatered Pothos Plant

If you think your Pothos plant is underwatered, the first thing you should do is give it a good drink.

Water the plant until the soil is saturated and water starts to run out of the drainage holes.

Once the plant has had a chance to soak up some water, you should see an improvement in the condition of the leaves.

Water your Pothos plant regularly, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings.

If you’re unsure how often to water your plant, check the soil before giving it a drink.

If the top inch of soil is dry, it’s time to water.

2. Too Much Water

While a lack of water can cause Pothos leaves to droop, too much water can also be a problem.

If your Pothos plant’s roots sit in water, they will start to rot.

When roots rot, they can no longer absorb oxygen from the soil, causing the plant to suffocate.

This will lead to drooping leaves as the plant tries to conserve energy.

How To Tell If You’re Overwatering Your Pothos Plant

It’s essential to be careful not to overwater your Pothos plant. Here are a few signs that you may be giving your plant too much water:

  • Pothos leaves drooping: One of the first signs of overwatering is drooping leaves. If you notice that your Pothos leaves are wilting or looking limp, it’s a good idea to check the soil for moisture.
  • Pothos leaves turning yellow: Another sign of overwatering are yellow leaves. If the leaves of your Pothos plant start to turn yellow, it’s a good sign that the roots are waterlogged.
  • Pothos roots turning brown: If you notice that the roots of your Pothos plant are turning brown, it’s a sign that they are rotting. This can happen if the roots are sitting in water for too long.
  • Pothos leaves falling off: If the leaves of your Pothos plant start to fall off, it’s a sign that the plant is not getting the oxygen it needs. This is usually a result of overwatering.
  • The soil is soggy: One of the best ways to tell if you’re overwatering your Pothos plant is to check the soil. If the potting soil is soggy or waterlogged, it’s a sign that you’re giving your plant too much water.

How To Treat An Overwatered Pothos Plant

If you think your droopy Pothos plant is overwatered, the first thing you should do is stop watering it.

Allow the soil to dry out completely before giving your plant another drink.

You may also need to repot your plant in fresh, dry soil.

If the roots of your Pothos plant are rotting, you may need to cut them back to healthy tissue.

Once you’ve corrected the watering issue, you should see an improvement in the condition of your plant.

3. Low Humidity

Pothos leaves drooping is a common problem when the plant is not getting enough moisture.

Low humidity can cause many plant species to lose a large amount of water.

When this happens, the leaf droops because no water pressure keeps it up.

Pothos plants are especially susceptible to this problem because they are native to tropical climates where the air is more humid.

If you live in a dry climate or if your home is particularly dry, it’s essential to provide extra humidity for your Pothos plant.

How To Tell If Your Pothos Plant Needs More Humidity

There are a few signs that you can look for to tell if your Pothos plant needs more humidity:

  • Pothos leaves drooping: One of the first signs of low humidity is drooping leaves. If you notice that your Pothos leaves are wilting or looking limp, it’s a good sign that the air is too dry.
  • Pothos leaves turning brown: Another sign of low humidity is browning leaves. If the edges of your Pothos leaves start to turn brown, it’s a good sign that the air is too dry.
  • Pothos leaves curling: If the leaves of your Pothos plant start to curl, it’s a sign that the air is too dry. Curling leaves is usually a result of the plant losing too much water.

How To Treat A Pothos Plant That Needs More Humidity

If you think your Pothos plant needs more humidity, you can do a few things to help.

First, you can try misting your plant with water. This will help to increase the humidity around your plant.

You can also try placing your plant on a pebble tray. This is a tray filled with pebbles and water. The water will evaporate and help to increase the humidity around your plant.

Finally, you can try moving your plant to a more humid environment. This could be a bathroom, kitchen, or anywhere else that has higher humidity.

4. Temperature Stress

Pothos leaves drooping can also be caused by temperature stress.

This common problem occurs when the temperature around your plant is too hot or too cold.

If the temperature is too hot, it can cause the plant to lose water faster than it can take it in. This will cause the leaves to droop.

If the temperature is too cold, it can cause the plant to slow down its metabolism. This can lead to a plant’s toxins build-up, which can cause droopy leaves.

How To Tell If Your Pothos Plant Is Stressed By Temperature

There are a few signs that you can look for to tell if your Pothos plant is stressed by temperature:

  • Pothos leaves drooping: One of the first signs of temperature stress is drooping leaves. If you notice that your Pothos leaves are wilting or looking limp, it’s a good sign that the temperature is too hot or too cold.
  • Pothos leaves turning yellow: If the temperature is too hot, it can cause the leaves to turn yellow. If the temperature is too cold, it can cause the leaves to turn brown.
  • Pothos flowers falling off: If the temperature is too hot or too cold, it can cause the flowers to fall off the plant.
  • Pothos plant stunted growth: If the temperature is too hot or too cold, it can cause the plant to stop growing.

How To Fix Temperature Stress In Your Pothos Plant

If you think your Pothos plant is stressed by temperature, you can do a few things to help.

First, you can try moving your plant to a more moderate environment. This could be a spot that gets indirect sunlight and has a consistent temperature.

You can also try adding a humidifier to the room where your plant is. This will help keep the air around your plant moist, which can help reduce stress.

Finally, you can mist your Pothos plant with water. This will help keep the leaves from drying out and getting stressed by the temperature.

5. Too Little Light

Pothos drooping can also be caused by too little light.

This common problem occurs when the plant is not getting enough sunlight.

Without enough sunlight, the plant cannot produce food through photosynthesis. This can lead to a plant’s toxins build-up, which can cause the leaves to droop.

How To Tell If Your Pothos Plant Is Not Getting Enough Light

There are a few signs that you can look for to tell if your Pothos plant is not getting enough light:

  • Pothos leaves turning yellow: One of the first signs of too little light is yellowing leaves. If you notice that your Pothos leaves are turning yellow, it’s a good sign that the plant is not getting enough light.
  • Pothos leaves falling off: Another sign of too little light is leaves falling off the plant. If you notice that your Pothos plant is losing leaves, it’s a good indication that it’s not getting enough light.
  • Pothos stretching: Stretching is another sign of too little light. If you notice that your Pothos plant is getting taller and leggy, it’s a good sign that it’s not getting enough light.

How To Fix Too Little Light In Your Pothos Plant

If you think your Pothos plant is not getting enough light, you can do a few things to help.

First, you can try moving your plant to a spot with more sunlight. This could be a spot near a window or outside in the garden.

A west- or south-facing window is ideal. This will give your plant the most amount of sunlight possible.

You can also try using grow lights. Grow lights are artificial lights that mimic sunlight. They can be a great way to provide your plant with the light it needs to thrive.

6. Pests

Pests are another common cause of Pothos leaves drooping.

Pests can cause stress to your plant, leading to droopy leaves.

Common pests that can infest Pothos plants include aphids, mealybugs, and spider mites.

These pests can suck the nutrients and moisture out of your plant, which can cause the leaves to droop.

They can also spread disease, which can further stress your plant.

How To Tell If Your Pothos Plant Has Pests

There are a few signs you can look for to tell if your Pothos plant has pests:

  • Pothos leaves with holes: One of the first signs of pests is holes in the leaves. If you notice that your Pothos leaves have holes, it’s a good sign that the plant has pests.
  • Pothos leaves turning yellow: Another sign of pests is yellowing leaves. If you notice that your Pothos leaves are turning yellow, it’s a good indication that the plant has pests.
  • Pothos leaves with black spots: Black spots on Pothos leaves can also be a sign of pests. If you notice that your Pothos leaves have black spots, it’s a good sign that the plant has pests.
  • Pothos leaves with white powder: White powder on the leaves is another sign of pests. If you notice that your Pothos leaves have white powder, it’s a good indication that the plant has pests.

How To Get Rid Of Pests On Your Pothos Plant

If you think your Pothos plant has pests, you can do a few things to get rid of them.

The first thing you can do is try to remove the pests by hand. This can be done by gently wiping them off with a damp cloth.

You can also try using insecticidal soap or neem oil. These products are safe for plants and will help to kill pests.

Finally, you can try using beneficial insects. Beneficial insects are insects that prey on other pests. They can be a great way to get rid of pests without using chemicals.

7. Transplant Shock

Transplant shock is another common cause of Pothos leaves drooping.

Transplant shock occurs when a plant is transplanted from one pot to another. This can be a stressful event for the plant, leading to the leaves drooping.

The stress of transplanting can also cause the roots to become damaged. This can further stress the plant and lead to the leaves drooping.

How To Tell If Your Pothos Plant Is Experiencing Transplant Shock

There are a few signs you can look for to tell if your Pothos plant is experiencing transplant shock:

  • Pothos leaves with brown tips: One of the first signs of transplant shock is brown tips on the leaves. If you notice that your pothos leaves have brown tips, it’s a good sign that the plant is experiencing transplant shock.
  • Pothos leaves with yellow spots: Another sign of transplant shock is yellow spots on the leaves. If you notice that your pothos leaves have yellow spots, it’s a good sign that the plant is experiencing transplant shock.
  • Pothos leaves drooping: One of the most common signs of transplant shock is drooping leaves. If you notice that your pothos leaves are drooping, it’s a good sign that the plant is experiencing transplant shock.

How To Treat Transplant Shock In Pothos Plants

If you think your Pothos plant is experiencing transplant shock, there are a few things you can do to help the plant recover:

  • Give the plant time to adjust: One of the best things you can do for a plant experiencing transplant shock is give it time to adjust. Transplant shock can be stressful for a plant, and it will take time to recover.
  • Water the plant: Another thing you can do to help a plant experiencing transplant shock is watering it. Transplant shock can cause the roots to become damaged, which can lead to the plant not getting enough water.
  • Prune the plant: If you notice that your Pothos plant is losing leaves, you can prune the plant. Pruning will help the plant to focus its energy on new growth.
  • Place the plant in a warm location: Transplant shock can be exacerbated by cold temperatures. If you think your Pothos plant is experiencing transplant shock, place it in a warm area.
  • Give the plant extra humidity: You can also give it extra moisture to help a plant experiencing transplant shock. Transplant shock can cause the leaves to droop, and extra humidity will help prevent this.

How To Prevent Pothos Leaves From Drooping

To prevent your Pothos leaves from drooping, you must provide them with the proper conditions.

Here are some tips:

  1. Make sure your Pothos is getting enough light. While they tolerate lower light levels, they will thrive in bright indirect light.
  2. Water your Pothos regularly, giving them a thorough watering when the top 2-3 inches of soil are dry to the touch.
  3. Keep the humidity around your Pothos high, as they prefer humid conditions. This can be achieved by grouping plants together, using a pebble tray, or misting the leaves regularly.
  4. Allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings, as Pothos are susceptible to root rot if left in soggy soil.
  5. Repot your Pothos in fresh soil every 1-2 years to provide them with nutrients and encourage new growth.
  6. Prune your Pothos regularly to remove yellow or dying leaves and encourage new growth.
  7. Fertilize your Pothos every 2-4 weeks during the growing season with a balanced fertilizer to provide them with nutrients.

Following these tips, you can prevent your Pothos leaves from drooping and keep your plant healthy and happy.

Final Thoughts

Pothos is a hardy and easy to care for plant, making them an excellent choice for beginners.

However, even experienced gardeners can run into problems from time to time.

If your Pothos leaves drooping, it could be due to several factors.

By taking a closer look at your plant and making some adjustments to its care, you can get your Pothos back to looking its best in no time.