How To Revive a Dying Pothos Plant (10 Causes & Solutions)

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If you’ve ever had a Pothos plant (Epipremnum aureum), you know that they’re incredibly easy to take care of.

In fact, most people can’t kill them even if they try.

But sometimes, for no apparent reason, Pothos plants start to wilt and die.

Before you give up on your plant, there are a few things you can do to revive it.

Here we’ll explore the 10 most common causes of Pothos death, and provide solutions on how to revive a dying Pothos plant.

How Do You Know if Your Pothos Is Dying

Pothos, also known as Devil’s Ivy plant, are among the most popular houseplants due to their easy care requirements and ability to thrive in various conditions.

However, even the hardiest Pothos can succumb to disease or pests.

If you think your Pothos may be dying, there are a few signs to look for:

Discolored Leaves

The most common sign that a Pothos is dying is the leaves turning yellow, brown, or black.

This can be caused by several factors, including too much sun, too little water, or a nutrient deficiency.

Wilting Leaves

Another common sign that a Pothos is dying is wilting leaves.

This can be caused by too little water, too much sun, or root rot.

Dry Leaves

If Pothos leaves are dry and brittle, it is a sign that the plant is not getting enough moisture.

This can be caused by too little water, too much sun, or low humidity.

Drooping Leaves

If the Pothos leaves are drooping, it is a sign that the plant is not getting enough water.

This can be caused by too little water, too much sun, or low humidity.

If you notice any of these signs, it’s essential to take action immediately to revive your Pothos.

Why Is My Pothos Dying and How To Save It

Pothos plants are one of the easiest indoor plants to care for, but even they can start to wilt and die if they’re not getting the proper care.

If you’ve noticed your Pothos plant looking wilted and unhealthy, don’t despair! In most cases, it is possible to revive a dying Pothos plant.

To help you revive your Pothos plant, where are the most common reasons why Pothos plants die, along with solutions on how to fix each problem.

Too Much Water

Pothos plants are very tolerant of different watering schedules, but they can die if kept too wet.

The plant roots need oxygen to respire, and too much water can cause the roots to suffocate.

In addition, overwatering can lead to root rot caused by a build-up of water-borne pathogens.

These pathogens can kill the plant’s roots, preventing it from taking up water and nutrients.

As a result, Pothos leaves will begin to yellow and wilt, eventually leading to the death of the plant.

It is important to allow the soil to dry out between watering to prevent this from happening.

Pothos plants are also sensitive to fluoride, commonly found in tap water.

To avoid fluoride damage, it is best to use distilled or filtered water when watering your Pothos plant.

How To Save an Overwatered Pothos Plants

Overwatered Pothos plants are not uncommon.

The first sign of overwatering is usually when the leaves start to turn yellow and droop.

If the plant is allowed to sit in water, the roots will begin to rot, and the plant will eventually die.

If you catch the problem early enough, you can do a few things to save an overwatered Pothos plant.

The most important thing is to stop watering the plant immediately and allow the soil to dry out completely.

Once the soil is dry, you can start watering again, but be sure only to give the plant enough water to dampen the soil, not saturate it.

In addition, you may need to repot the plant to get rid of any root rot.

Too Little Water

Pothos plants are tough and adaptable, but they can still suffer if they don’t receive enough water.

Without the right amount of moisture, Pothos leaves will turn brown and crispy, eventually leading to the plant’s death.

There are a few reasons why this happens.

First, lack of water prevents the plant from taking up nutrients from the soil, which it needs to survive.

Second, water is used by plants to create energy through photosynthesis.

Without enough water, the plant will not be able to produce the food it needs to stay alive.

Finally, water helps keep the leaves of the plant moist, which prevents them from drying out and dying.

When a Pothos plant doesn’t receive enough water, it will slowly start to wilt and die.

To prevent this from happening, it is important to water the plant regularly, ensuring that the soil is damp but not saturated.

How To Save an Underwatered Pothos Plant

If your Pothos plant looks wilted and lifeless, it might be because it’s not getting enough water.

Underwatering is a common problem with Pothos plants, but fortunately, it’s relatively easy to fix.

The first step is to give the plant a good soaking.

Water the soil until it’s thoroughly wet, and let the excess water drain away.

Once the plant has had a chance to soak up some water, it should start to look perkier.

After the initial watering, be sure to water the plant regularly, ensuring that the soil stays moist but not soggy.

Pothos plants need to be watered about once a week, but this may vary depending on the plant’s size and the climate it is growing in.

Too Little Light

Pothos plants are known for their ability to thrive in a wide range of conditions, including low-light environments.

However, if they do not receive enough light, they will eventually die. There are several reasons for this.

First, without enough light, the leaves of a Pothos plant will begin to turn yellow and fall off.

This is because the plant cannot produce enough chlorophyll, which is essential for photosynthesis.

Second, a lack of light can also cause the stems of a Pothos plant to become weak and spindly.

This is because the plant is not receiving enough energy to support its growth.

Finally, without enough light, a Pothos plant will not be able to produce the food it needs to survive.

How To Save a Pothos Plant That Is Not Getting Enough Light

If your Pothos plant is not getting enough light, the first thing you need to do is move it to a brighter location.

A spot near a window where it can get bright indirect sunlight would be ideal.

Pothos plants need at least four hours of sunlight per day to survive.

If you cannot provide your plant with enough natural light, you may need to supplement it with artificial lighting.

Grow lights are a good option for plants that are not getting enough light.

These lights provide the plant with the energy it needs to grow and produce food.

Too Much Sunlight

Pothos plants are very versatile and can adapt to a range of different growing conditions.

However, they will not tolerate direct sunlight and will quickly start to suffer if exposed to too much light.

The plant’s leaves will begin to turn yellow or brown, and eventually, the plant will die.

Too much sunlight can also cause the leaves to become scorched or dried out.

Pothos plants need bright indirect light to thrive, so it is important to avoid putting them in a spot where they will be exposed to direct sunlight.

How To Save a Pothos Plant That Is Getting Too Much Sunlight

Pothos plants are known for their ability to thrive in various conditions, but too much sunlight can be harmful.

If your Pothos is starting to show signs of distress, take action immediately to save the plant.

First, move the pot to a shadier location.

If possible, set it in an east-facing window where it will receive indirect light for most of the day.

If the leaves are already yellow or burned, cut them off with sharp scissors, being careful not to damage the stems.

Once you have removed the damaged leaves, water the plant thoroughly and give it time to adjust to its new environment.

Your Pothos will soon be looking healthy and green again with a bit of care.

Humidity Issues

Pothos plants are very sensitive to humidity levels. Even a slight change in moisture can cause the leaves to turn brown and crispy.

If the humidity is too low, the plant will dry out and eventually die.

The roots are particularly susceptible to drying out, so it’s important to keep the soil moist but not soggy.

If the humidity is too high, the plant will develop fungal diseases that will kill it.

In addition, high humidity levels can cause the leaves to turn yellow and drop off.

To prevent these problems, it’s important to maintain a consistent humidity level around your Pothos plant.

A good rule of thumb is to keep the humidity between 40-and 50%.

How To Save a Pothos Plant That Is Suffering From Humidity Issues

If your Pothos plant is suffering from humidity issues, the first thing you need to do is identify the problem.

If the humidity is too low, increase the moisture in the air by misting your Pothos daily or setting it on a pebble tray.

If the humidity is too high, improve air circulation by running a fan near the plant or opening a window.

You may also need to adjust your watering schedule to prevent the soil from becoming soggy.

Allow the top layer of soil to dry out before watering again.

You can get your Pothos plant back on track with a bit of care.

Temperature Stress

Pothos plants are tropical plants that require warm temperatures to thrive.

When the temperature drops below 30 degrees Fahrenheit, the plant’s metabolic processes begin to slow down.

This can cause Pothos leaves turning yellow and eventually die.

Pothos plants are also sensitive to cold drafts, further damaging the leaves. In severe cases, the entire plant may die.

While Pothos plants can tolerate brief periods of cooler temperatures, they cannot survive long-term exposure to cold weather.

On the other hand, Pothos plants can also suffer from heat stress.

When the temperature rises above 90 degrees Fahrenheit, the plant’s leaves will wilt and turn brown.

The plant may also stop growing and produce fewer leaves.

It is important to keep your Pothos plant in a warm, draft-free location to prevent these problems.

How To Save a Pothos Plant That Is Suffering From Temperature Stress

If your Pothos plant is suffering from temperature stress, you first need to identify the problem.

If the temperature is too cold, move the plant to a warmer location.

If the temperature is too hot, move the plant to a cooler location.

Pothos plants need temperatures between 60 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit to thrive.

In addition, you may need to adjust your watering schedule to prevent the roots from freezing or overheating.

When the temperature is very hot, Pothos plants will need to be watered more frequently.

When the temperature is very cold, Pothos plants will need to be watered less frequently.

Pest Infestation

One of the most common reasons Pothos plants die is pest infestation.

While these plants are relatively resilient, they are susceptible to attack from various pests, including aphids, mealybugs, and whiteflies.

These pests can quickly overwhelm a plant, leading to dehydration and eventual death.

In addition, pest infestations can also introduce harmful diseases to a Pothos plant, further weakening its health.

To avoid these problems, it is important to regularly inspect your plants for signs of pests and take prompt action if an infestation is found.

How To Save a Pothos Plant That Is Suffering From a Pest Infestation

If your Pothos plant is suffering from a pest infestation, you first need to identify the problem.

Once you have identified the pests, you can take steps to remove them from your plant.

For small infestations, you may be able to remove the pests by hand. Use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to kill aphids, mealybugs, and whiteflies.

You can use neem oil or insecticidal soap to kill the pests for larger infestations.

Follow the instructions on the product label and apply the treatment every 7-10 days until the pests are gone.

Root Rot

Pothos plants are susceptible to root rot, which can cause the plant to die.

Root rot is caused by a fungus that attacks the plant’s roots.

The fungus grows in wet, humid conditions and can quickly spread to the rest of the plant.

Once the fungus has infected the roots, it breaks down the tissue, causing the roots to rot.

The rotting roots cannot absorb water or nutrients from the soil, and the plant begins to die.

Root rot is particularly dangerous because it can spread quickly and kill a Pothos plant within a few days.

To prevent root rot, it is important to keep the roots of Pothos plants dry and free from standing water.

How To Save a Pothos Plant That Is Suffering From Root Rot

If your Pothos plant is suffering from root rot, you can do a few things to save it.

First, remove the plant from its pot and inspect the roots.

If they are soft or mushy, they are probably afflicted with root rot.

Cutaway any affected roots with a sterile knife, being sure to dispose of them immediately.

Once you have removed all of the affected roots, replant the Pothos in a new pot filled with fresh soil.

Water the plant sparingly until it recovers.

Keep an eye on the Pothos, as root rot can quickly spread and kill the plant if left unchecked.

With a bit of care, you should be able to save your Pothos plant from root rot.

Poor Drainage

Pothos plants are native to tropical rainforests, where they often grow on trees or other surfaces that provide good drainage.

In their natural habitat, Pothos plants receive frequent rainfall and have access to plenty of fresh water.

However, when Pothos plants are grown in potting soil that doesn’t drain well, they can quickly become waterlogged and begin to die.

Poor drainage prevents oxygen from reaching the roots, causing them to rot.

Additionally, waterlogged soil can encourage the growth of mold and mildew, which can further damage the plant.

It is important to plant Pothos in a pot with drainage holes and a well-draining potting mix to avoid these problems.

Be sure to water the plant sparingly, as too much water can cause root rot.

How To Save a Pothos Plant That Is Suffering From Poor Drainage

If you think that your Pothos plant has poor drainage, you can do a few things to save it.

First, check the drainage holes in the pot to make sure they are not blocked.

If they are blocked, use a skewer or chopstick to clear them.

Next, add some pebbles or rocks to the bottom of the pot to improve drainage. Finally, replant the Pothos in a well-draining potting mix.

Water the plant sparingly until it recovers.

With a bit of care, you should be able to save your Pothos plant from poor drainage.

Nutrient Deficiency

Pothos plants are susceptible to nutrient deficiencies, which can cause them to die.

One of the most common deficiencies is a lack of nitrogen, which is essential for plant growth.

Nitrogen deficiency causes the leaves of the plant to become yellow and stunted.

The plant may also produce fewer flowers and fruits.

Pothos plants need nutrients to thrive, including phosphorus, potassium, and magnesium.

A lack of these nutrients can cause the plant to become sick and eventually die.

How To Save a Pothos Plant That Is Suffering From a Nutrient Deficiency

If you suspect that your Pothos plant is suffering from a nutrient deficiency, you can do a few things to help it recover.

First, check the soil to ensure that it is not compacted or dry.

If the soil is too dry and compacted, you need to water it more frequently.

Additionally, you may need to change the potting mix.

If the soil does not have enough nutrients, you can add fertilizer to the water when you water the plant.

Use a balanced fertilizer and only add the amount recommended on the package, as too much fertilizer can damage the plant.

With a bit of care, you should be able to save your Pothos plant from a nutrient deficiency.

Final Thoughts

Pothos plants are a type of evergreen vine native to the Solomon Islands.

They are commonly used as houseplants or office plants because they are easy to care for and require little maintenance.

However, even the most low-maintenance plants can sometimes die if they are not cared for properly.

With proper care and attention, most dying Pothos plants can be revived.

If you think your Pothos plant is dying, take a closer look at it and try to identify the problem.

Once you know what is causing the plant to die, you can take steps to revive it. With a bit of care, you should be able to save your Pothos plant.